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laurieE

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About laurieE

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  1. I have worked for 25 years with 105 Standard Low Fire clay and occasionally underglaze (Mayco or Duncan) would flake off, usually it was a certain color that was problematic. Increasingly and unpredictably, the underglazes fail. This has happened to both me and another friend who works with low-fire constantly in the last year or two. I recently discovered in a few of my tiles that the underglaze flaked off after they were bisque fired in all sorts of odd places (where the UG was not over-loaded, or on a curved surface--none of that), just random places. I knew better than to try to repaint the underglaze and re-fire because it just doesn't work. It seems like once it begins to fail, it will just keep popping off in other places if it's repaired and re-fired (before final clear glazing). I can't determine if this is a clay or underglaze issue. I just bought some Rovins #42 (in Michigan) and will experiment with that. I prefer mid-range anyway these days but I would like to do some of my work in low fire. I know there are so many variables to consider so this is a difficult problem to diagnose. I did not over wipe the surfaces or use too much water, I actually used a compressor to blow off dust before working on the clay. I guess I am writing to see if anyone else has these problems. I have not called Standard Clay or the glaze companies yet.
  2. Community Project

    Thanks so much; I checked into the transfer paper and I think that might be the solution. I appreciate your time to offer this!
  3. Community Project

    Can anyone think of the best way the public could sign their names onto bisqued tile pieces? Brushes just require too much skill. This Community Project is done outdoors under a tent. I've enclosed a detail of a previous project. The signatures would go on the white shards.
  4. I am considering switching my clay body for a mosaic that will have large press-molded thick relief areas (the largest area is 17" across). Has anyone worked in the Laguna/Miller clay body-North Eastern #30 which is a cone 5/6. I am wondering about it's stability and how it is to sculpt with and press-mold.
  5. Hi Beth, I live in Michigan outside of Detroit. I use the Standard white 105 for my low-fire but it's been the Laguna/Miller clay for mid-range. I will research what you are suggesting since I have a supplier for that brand. Thank you for your suggestions!
  6. I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it... I wasn't going to send you the clay. I will give you the recipe. You could mix up enough to make a tile or two and see if it did what you wanted. You wouldn't need to make a 100 lb just enough for a test run. I fit doesn't do what you like you are out a few cups of ingrediente and some messy hands. If you are use to a certain clay body it is hard to try other clays. We become monogomamous to our clay. Ain't Clay fun Kabe Thanks Kabe, I think that I will try a clay that my supplier has that has more grog in it but it still supposed to be the rich rusty brown color.
  7. I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it... I wasn't going to send you the clay. I will give you the recipe. You could mix up enough to make a tile or two and see if it did what you wanted. You wouldn't need to make a 100 lb just enough for a test run. I fit doesn't do what you like you are out a few cups of ingrediente and some messy hands. If you are use to a certain clay body it is hard to try other clays. We become monogomamous to our clay. Ain't Clay fun Kabe
  8. I mix my own clay for my tile and it has a lot of grog in it. I do not have hardly any trouble with warppage or cracking. I don't have to baby it a whole lot. Mixing your own clay is a pain and creates it's own set of challenges. A supplier near me will mix my own mix for me but I have to get 1000 lbs at a time. If you are interested in the mix e-mail me and I will send it to you. It is sort of a gray firing stoneware. Also if you change your clay to much it can effect the color of your finished glazes but maybe not as much with 5 oxidization compared to reduction. ain't clay fun! Kabe Thanks for the offer, but you're apparently in Missouri. (shipping would get too high!)...I also loved the color of my clay and how the glazes worked on it...
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  10. Thanks Marcia, I will talk to my clay supplier about that type of clay. I never thought about waxing the edges; that's a great idea. I am using wc390 cone 5 clay from laguna
  11. Thanks Marcia, I will talk to my clay supplier about that type of clay. I never thought about waxing the edges; that's a great idea.
  12. Hi I will have a look at the make up of the clay I use. I am in spain so the brands are different. I am making tile murals in relief all the time and so far have had only minimal warpage. One thing I do do though is carve out the backs of tiles that get really thick. I will let you know.... Trina Thanks Trina, I am especially concerned about getting the larger pieces to fire without cracking.
  13. Thanks Marcia, I will talk to my clay supplier about that type of clay. I never thought about waxing the edges; that's a great idea.
  14. Currently, I am working on a project that involves large 12" relief tile and also large shaped tiles for a mosaic. I have used #90 Laguna (cone 5) for years but I am having challenges with cracking. I may need a clay with more grog but I am uncertain what to explore. I dry the tile on drywall sheets very slowly, covering them with newspapers, transferring them to dry boards after they are stable enough to move. I am now wrapping the edges to avoid drying the edges to quickly. They dry for over two weeks before they are bisqued. I do not have a computerized kiln but I bring them up very slowly--over 15 hours...
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