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Silicone Glue Mixed With Porcelain Slip


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I just saw this mentioned in a book and when I googled the name of the person, nothing came up. Darrol clark. I dont know where he is from but this book mentions that he pioneered this mixture and he extrudes strands and weaves them to heights of 24 inches. does anyone know of percentages and if he used porcelain slip? I belive he used aporcelain slip because the demonstration piece mentioned porcelain.

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Thank you for your response but there was not much info at all. One paragraph that mentioned how this guy adds silicone glue to slip and is able to stretch tiny extruded pieces into web or fishing nets sometimes 24 inches high? I brought up zero when I googled his name.

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Hello Rosemary

Darroll Clark wrote an article entitled Silicone clay. It was published in Ceramics Monthly December 1982. As this is a very old article and may be hard to get, I have scanned it and attached it as a.pdf. I have found the article index for Ceramics Monthly on the Ceramic Arts Daily site very beneficial. It helps me to search online and then refer back to my Ceramic Monthly collection.Silicone.pdf

Johanna

Silicone.pdf

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I just saw this mentioned in a book and when I googled the name of the person, nothing came up. Darrol clark. I dont know where he is from but this book mentions that he pioneered this mixture and he extrudes strands and weaves them to heights of 24 inches. does anyone know of percentages and if he used porcelain slip? I belive he used aporcelain slip because the demonstration piece mentioned porcelain.

 

 

 

This is the Darroll Clark that was in the book and published an article in Ceramics Monthly in 1982. I stopped publishing further information about this clay because of concerns i have that people would fire the clay mixture in electric indoor kilns- because I discovered this can be dangerous and unhealthy.

 

Tonight I was playing with my new iPad, Googled my name, and discovered people were interested in my discovery so I registered in this forum to respond.

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This sounds very interesting.

My guess is the glue adheres as the piece gets taller??

Did they say what happened when the glue fired out?

 

 

This is Darroll Clark. The clay behaves as regular clay for the few minutes before it cures. The clay stretches after it is cured because it behaves like rubber after curing until it is fired. In firing, it shrinks as the sintering and then vitrification increases just like other clays. The word "Slip" gives the wrong impression. There is no water involved. It is not slip-like.

Please Never try working with silicone glue mixtures in an electric kiln - especially never indoors it can be very dangerous.

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On the Potters Council tour in Italy, we visited the studio of Antonella Cimatti in Faenza. She teaches at the Ceramics Institute there. She showed us her work with silicon/porcelain. Here is one example of her butterflies

She also was adding felt to some of her work.

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This sounds very interesting.

My guess is the glue adheres as the piece gets taller??

Did they say what happened when the glue fired out?

 

 

This is Darroll Clark. The clay behaves as regular clay for the few minutes before it cures. The clay stretches after it is cured because it behaves like rubber after curing until it is fired. In firing, it shrinks as the sintering and then vitrification increases just like other clays. The word "Slip" gives the wrong impression. There is no water involved. It is not slip-like.

Please Never try working with silicone glue mixtures in an electric kiln - especially never indoors it can be very dangerous.

 

 

Thank you for posting the warning Darroll. And welcome to the forum.

Marcia

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