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Anabaptist Ceramics Ca. 1550-1700

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Hi, I am looking for information on the Anabaptist ceramic industry in Europe ca. 1550-1700 centred in Moravia and Boheimia. At times also known as Habaner ceramics. Some of the descendants of these people live in the USA and Canada and are known as Hutterites. These Anabaptists They created new styles and techniques which I am interested in. I am coming at this from a history perspective as I have no experience in ceramics myself. I would be interested in knowing details about what these techniques were. They began using different materials to produce different colors, so what materials would have been used? Characteristic colours for the glaze were blue, white, yellow and green. For the decoration they used yellow, green, violet, blue and black they used for contour. in the 1600s Where did they get these materials from? How did they fire the items? I would be open to advise, or direction to books, journals or other experts in the field. Thanx for your help!

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Hi, I am looking for information on the Anabaptist ceramic industry in Europe ca. 1550-1700 centred in Moravia and Boheimia. At times also known as Habaner ceramics. Some of the descendants of these people live in the USA and Canada and are known as Hutterites. These Anabaptists They created new styles and techniques which I am interested in. I am coming at this from a history perspective as I have no experience in ceramics myself. I would be interested in knowing details about what these techniques were. They began using different materials to produce different colors, so what materials would have been used? Characteristic colours for the glaze were blue, white, yellow and green. For the decoration they used yellow, green, violet, blue and black they used for contour. in the 1600s Where did they get these materials from? How did they fire the items? I would be open to advise, or direction to books, journals or other experts in the field. Thanx for your help!

 

 

Hello

My online research of the Anabaptist ceramics tells me that "The ceramics were called faience or majolica, depending on the process used to make it."

An online search of "faience or majolica" should answer all your questions.

Johanna

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Hi, I am looking for information on the Anabaptist ceramic industry in Europe ca. 1550-1700 centred in Moravia and Boheimia. At times also known as Habaner ceramics. Some of the descendants of these people live in the USA and Canada and are known as Hutterites. These Anabaptists They created new styles and techniques which I am interested in. I am coming at this from a history perspective as I have no experience in ceramics myself. I would be interested in knowing details about what these techniques were. They began using different materials to produce different colors, so what materials would have been used? Characteristic colours for the glaze were blue, white, yellow and green. For the decoration they used yellow, green, violet, blue and black they used for contour. in the 1600s Where did they get these materials from? How did they fire the items? I would be open to advise, or direction to books, journals or other experts in the field. Thanx for your help!

 

I know there were Anabaptist in Pennsylvania in 1700s but didn't know about the ceramics. Were the Pa. Dutch ceramic traditions related to that? I think I 'll do some searching. thanks for that interesting topic.The Dunkards were Anabaptists and settled Dunkards Creek in Green Co. Pa.

 

Marcia

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Thank you for the reply. That is an interesting question, as far as I know the Anabaptists/Mennonites in PA have different geographic origins than the Anabaptists who became know as Hutterites and fled to Moravia in the mid 1500s and then were expelled in 1622. While in Moravia they learned the Italian style ceramics. The theory is that some religiously persecuted groups in Italy fled to Moravia where they passed on the ceramic knoweldge. The Hutterites then made alterations to make it thier own. The link to Italy in process is evident but how that link was made so far is at best a theory. This was a different context than the Mennonites who came to PA in the ealry-mid 1600s. I am wondering what process or compounds did they use in Moravia that made thier materials unique?

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I don't know if you've seen this book. I found it in on the Hutterite Brethren Book Centre website:

 

The Potter's Art: Contributions to the Study of the Koerner Collection of European Ceramics

Edited by Carol E. Mayer

The essays in this book grew out of a meeting of international scholars, curators, and potters who came together in 1991 to share knowledge and ideas about the Koerner collection of European ceramics, which is housed at the University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology.

This collection of ceramics is unique in Canada. It covers a range, both chronological and technical, that is rare in North American collections. The 600 pieces in the collection were made between 1500 and 1900 and were found in kitchens and dining-rooms as tools of food preparation, serving, and display; in cellars as storage containers; in churches as religious figures and containers for holy water; in pharmacies as containers of medicine; and in palaces as tiled stoves. In their many variations they represent an integral part of human history.

(ISBN: 978-088895-126-6)

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Further to my previous reply I can highly recommend the book:

Caiger-Smith, Alan, Tin-Glaze Pottery in Europe and the Islamic World: The Tradition of 1000 Years in Maiolica, Faience and Delftware (Faber and Faber, 1973) ISBN 0-571-09349-3

 

Alan Caiger -Smith is a highly respected ceramist who worked in Reduced lustre which is a progression of the Maiolica Tradition. Also the Reference and Further Readings lists appended to the Wikipedia listing on Tin-glazed Pottery is an excellent bibliography to investigate. I can also recommend the video "Making Lustre Pottery" with Alan Caiger-Smith in which Alan steps you visualy through the production of tin glazed ware ready for the relevant decoration. I purchased this online from the Ashmolean Museum in London at a very modest price. The link for this is http://www.ashmolean.org/shop/?cat=19

 

Johanna

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Hi, I am looking for information on the Anabaptist ceramic industry in Europe ca. 1550-1700 centred in Moravia and Boheimia. At times also known as Habaner ceramics. Some of the descendants of these people live in the USA and Canada and are known as Hutterites. These Anabaptists They created new styles and techniques which I am interested in. I am coming at this from a history perspective as I have no experience in ceramics myself. I would be interested in knowing details about what these techniques were. They began using different materials to produce different colors, so what materials would have been used? Characteristic colours for the glaze were blue, white, yellow and green. For the decoration they used yellow, green, violet, blue and black they used for contour. in the 1600s Where did they get these materials from? How did they fire the items? I would be open to advise, or direction to books, journals or other experts in the field. Thanx for your help!

 

I know there were Anabaptist in Pennsylvania in 1700s but didn't know about the ceramics. Were the Pa. Dutch ceramic traditions related to that? I think I 'll do some searching. thanks for that interesting topic.The Dunkards were Anabaptists and settled Dunkards Creek in Green Co. Pa.

 

Marcia

 

The Moravian tile works founded by Henry Mercer was inspired by his collection of cast iron Moravian stoves from colonial Pennsylvania imported with Germans from Moravian. I am unfamiliar with the European faence of the Anabaptists. The Moravian tile works is in Doylestown, Pa. Just north of Philadelphia. It was reopened and revitalized in the 1970s.

Marcia

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My family were Brethren in Russia, but so far as I know, only used plain, unglazed earthenware. They were terribly strict. But now I'm intrigued and I'll be checking up on this. I'll let you know if I find anything interesting. I know they traded with both Russians and Romanians (and Rom), whose traditions in ceramics were very different.

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Hi, I just saw a beautiful Anabaptist pot at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver BC. See article by the Collector/ Donator: http://www.slovakher...ists/habans.htm

This round black pot is huge, probably 18 - 20 inches in diameter. Best wishes in your research.

 

 

A black pot would have been fine with my people, with a little incised decoration. I'm going to check up on it!

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