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Finally! I Am Learning To Post Pictures!


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going to post some pics of work started but not yet glazed. pics taken in march in fl.  later glazed and some have sold. post-2431-0-54424800-1432055923_thumb.jpg 

 

and some of the empty bowls with the cobalt slip and white matte glaze.  these are gone or broken now.

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post-2431-0-54424800-1432055923_thumb.jpg

post-2431-0-37070300-1432058285_thumb.jpg

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am so excited, now i just have to find and label all the pictures i want to share.  some of the ones in the gallery are just the ones the instructor found in my camera and put into the gallery just to show me how. 

 

is there a limit in the gallery?  i would like to put some good ones in.

 

she also started on a website and an ETSY site.  she will return when i need her.  HOORAY!

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you must be looking at the gallery pics.  yes, mark.  i have silica sand on each shelf in my WV kiln, the brown stuff you see is medium grog because the local supplier did not have silica sand when i set up the used florida kiln. (you can see that the original owner did not use kiln wash and fired on the bottom of the kiln.)  the load seen on the slab roller was stacked in the bisque several pots deep.

 

those pics are of the bisque firing but when i glaze fire i am very careful.  i am careful when i load and even more careful to NOT move anything by sliding it once it is on a shelf.  sliding pushes the sand so it sometimes gets close enough to the glaze to stick sand to the bottoms.  careful not to lift anything if something is already on the shelf so sand does not land on the glazed pot on the shelf and stick.  most of my stuff has flat bottoms and the sand allows for shrinkage when i single fire.

 

since these pics are of the bisque stacking, not glaze firing, i do not have to be as careful in the bisque.  i put the grog in that kiln before i realized i would not use it for glaze firing and i am too lazy to remove it.  maybe i will glaze something, someday.

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OldLady: YAY I am so happy you are figuring it out. I LOVE LOVE LOVE your photos your work is gorgeous. I really like that your edges aren't just round or square but kind of free flowing and very unique. Now get some glazed stuff in your gallery! Etsy is a good place to start selling online they have a really good help section and walk you through all the steps.

 

Now it's time to tackle that scanner

 

T

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cannot breathe!      just made an appointment to see a restaurant owner in washington DC next week to discuss my making platters for her fabulous food !!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

she found my work on display at the corner store in waterford, va. and wanted to talk to the maker,   ME!    

 

got to go bouncing off the walls for awhile!

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WOW!   WOW!   even if it doesn't lead to anything, i am walking on air!  

 

now the important part.  i have one week.  going to put some vinegar on one of the plates glazed in the color she liked.  can one of you please check this recipe with the computerized glaze info to see if it is ok?  only the first steps.

 

Sapphire glaze  cone 6

 

frit 3134                     42.6

custer feldspar           25.5

edgar plastic kaolin    25.5

silica 235 325?           15 

 

total                          108.6

 

add cobalt oxide          2.1

       rutile                     4.3

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dh, thanks, i love making bowls with a wooden disk.

 

roberta, the criss cross on the fish is actually a triangular pattern of paintable wallpaper from a sample book at the paint store.

 

thank, diesel and babs, maybe you can suggest colors other than what i use once i post some of the colors.

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You want to be looking at the 'Unity' column. This is the ratio of oxides in a glaze with the fluxes always adding up to one for easy comparison with other glazes.

 

Here are some limit formulas that in theory should give you a good melt/glass that is stable. The unity values for each oxide want to be within the limits.

post-23281-0-39881000-1420576643_thumb.png
 
Congrats on the pictures :D

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bruce, i am sorry that i do not read chemical formulas. please, what does this really mean in ordinary terms?

 

just in case Bruce doesn't see this I'll jump in. In ordinary terms Roy reformulated it and his version was tested for cobalt leaching and Hesselbreth says it should be okay for functional pots. The main change Roy made was decrease the cobalt and add a titch of strontium.

Roy's recipe as on the link Bruce posted is:

 

Ferro Frit 3134............. 37.00

Custer Feldspar............. 16.00

Strontium Carbonate......... 4.00

EP Kaolin................... 26.00

Silica...................... 17.00

 

Cobalt Carbonate............ 2.50

Rutile...................... 4.50

=========

107.00

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thank you, min.  i really appreciate the info.  the plate on my kitchen counter is looking the same as it did with no apparent changes.   i will revise my recipe to include the new scientific term "titch of strontium".  i always enjoy finding a scrabble word that would be interesting to put down backwards.  :rolleyes:

 

noticed your new avatar when it came out.   beautiful shoreline.  where was it taken? can i find a larger picture to really see it all?

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changed my glaze recipe to follow the one you sent, min. thank you  and bruce for the help.  

 

the funny thing is that i have been unable to make a new batch for years because i did not have cobalt OXIDE,  i only had cobalt carbonate.  now that i have a pound of it, i have no recipes that call for it. :unsure:

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Oldlady ...I love the pictures of your stuff!  What are you using for your tray slump molds?  I love going to Goodwill and finding interesting shapes in plastic/silverplate/wood ... whatever they have.  The downside (or upside depending on how you look at it) is only having one of something.

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 thank you!  i have been so pleased that many of you like my stuff even though it was only bisque or greenware in the pictures.  can't wait for my second photopost lesson so i can show you how they came out after the glaze firing.  (i took extensive notes but the screen does not show the exact thing it did for the expert! sigh..)  tonight, i found the way to put words under them to explain what you see and deleted some others.

 

at the guild sale last week i felt like the extraneous potter.  someone brought her daughter who took over wrapping which was my job.  so i got to sit and watch the younger generation at work.  and got to talk to lots of great people about pots.  it was a glorious spring day, lovely to be extraneous.  (it was hard to not think "useless".)

 

the bad part for me is having so many good thrift shops in florida.  i could never find the real department stores but know of probably 20 thrift shops.  the salvation army is only a mile away and has a special on mondays for seniors.  found the 3 white ceramic trays i used for the pots pictured in the gallery and almost walked out without them until i realized i did not bring down my usual supply of plastic ones. they were all of $3 apiece.  it only takes a day to get them to the point of removal from the form and putting them on drywall to finish drying.  keeps the bottoms flat.  yeah, sometimes i warp one or two by twisting them.

 

the really bad part is that i cannot walk past the forms in the stores.  i have so many now that i have to cull out the ones that looked good but are really the wrong proportions or shape.  found a great plastic bowl with swoopy ends and have made a dozen.  i still have them all.  nobody likes them.  now what?

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changed my glaze recipe to follow the one you sent, min. thank you  and bruce for the help.  

 

the funny thing is that i have been unable to make a new batch for years because i did not have cobalt OXIDE,  i only had cobalt carbonate.  now that i have a pound of it, i have no recipes that call for it. :unsure:

 

Cobalt Carbonate when fired turns into Cobalt Oxide and Carbon Dioxide. The same way that we use Calcium Carbonate to add Calcium Oxide you can use Cobalt Carbonate to add Cobalt Oxide.

 

'The theoretical oxide form has 93% CoO while the carbonate has 63%. So if you want to switch from the oxide to the carbonate in a recipe, multiply by 93 and divide by 63. To switch from carbonate to oxide multiply by 63 and divide by 93.' http://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/cobalt_carbonate_229.html

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On your dozen swoopy bowls ... I haven't gotten to the point of selling my ceramics yet but in other crafts I've sold if something isn't walking out the door I try to make it special.  Either just put out 1 or 2 so you don't have a mass of inventory that says "I'm not selling" ... one of something says I'm unique.  You can also try to show what that thing is good for ... if it's big enough for fruit, you could get some nice looking artificial fruit... candy dish then some Godiva chocolates ... trinket bowl then keys, pocket knife, cell phone (old ones laying around).  Or maybe you could add another piece (with similar style/color/glaze) to it for a set ... chip and dip bowls.

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