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nathanhinshaw

City Studio: Firing Work?

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Hello All,

I'm in the process of setting up my studio for the first time in many years, and the first time where I'm not in a rural setting with access to a high fire wood kiln.

 

I'm wondering if anyone has advice for a low profile solution to firing in a city setting? I'm thinking Raku might be the way to go, but am open to ideas, kiln designs, or general advice. I'm partial to firings with a fair amount for unpredicability in the finished result--most of my experience has been in the cone 10+ range so I'm trying to find a happy medium between a week long anagama, and a cone 06 oxidation firing. Too much smoke and space are issues, otherwise I'm game to get my hands dirty and build, buy, or tweak something I can fire frequently.

 

Thanks!

Nathan

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Raku would not be low profile. Too much smoke and odor. An electric kiln would be the lowest profile you can go.

 

What sort of space do you have? Do you have and indoor space? Do you own or rent? Tell us about your setup and we can give better answers.

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I do raku in the city but my yard is fairly secluded. I don't make a lot of smoke. I also do sagger firing, obvara and foil firing.

 

Many municipalities have open burning restrictions, which raku firing may fall under. I would certainly check with the local authorities. They will most likely know nothing about it, so you'll have to educate them.

 

You'll still need a bisque kiln. It's possible to do in a raku kiln, but difficult.

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Guest JBaymore

If you watch Steven Branfman do raku....... there can be almost zero smoke and solid reduction and carbonization to the clay body. 

 

Since this type of raku work is almost instantly in a sealed container..... and it is not opened until it is COLD... it is not "open burning".  No 'pull it out and quench it'.  So no flames and smoke and burning.

 

Kilns, including wood kilns, are not "open burning" and you should strive to NOT have the process ever classified that way (for everyone's sake).

 

best,

 

....................john

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If you watch Steven Branfman do raku....... there can be almost zero smoke and solid reduction and carbonization to the clay body. 

 

Since this type of raku work is almost instantly in a sealed container..... and it is not opened until it is COLD... it is not "open burning".  No 'pull it out and quench it'.  So no flames and smoke and burning.

 

Kilns, including wood kilns, are not "open burning" and you should strive to NOT have the process ever classified that way (for everyone's sake).

 

best,

 

....................john

 

I get your point, and agree completely, but I have have more than one fire marshall tell me that a wood kiln would be classified as open burning. To them, raku would be the same since you're lighting stuff on fire.

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Thanks for the comments all.

 

A little more background: I own my property and have a backyard space that is not shared. I've noticed some backyard burning, and have had my smoker out--so there is some room to play around. In my previous research there were regulations around the amount of smoke and the need for spark dampers to control brick ovens and firepits.

 

The municiple code allows “the burning of fuels for legitimate campfire, recreational and cooking purposes,â€[...] so I'm still thinking that small kiln without heavy reduction could be doable, if anyone has experimented with something like that?

 

Thanks!

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It sounds like the obvara, saggar and foil firing like Marcia does would suit your location needs and your the way you like to work and fire.  I believe she has some videos on-line.  Denice

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Neil: My goal is to produce semi-functional wares: vases, bowels, etc.

 

Denice: thanks for those suggestions, there are some interesting ideas there.

 

Mark: I think you might be on the right track, my heart is with the process and end result of the wood fire which but how to achieve those ends is still a bit iffy, that's why I'd thought about something like raku as an option. Going gas keeps popping up though.

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You could have a small propane kiln. Simon Leach has a bunch of videos on turning an old electric into a two burner high fire kiln. He fires to cone 10 in a double garage. I would fire outside. He dusts the outside of his pots with wood-ash and fires them rim to rim.

Check him out.

TJR.

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