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Hi Everyone,

I remember reading something several years ago about the possibility of a kiln off-gassing and permanently fogging up windows in the building.

 

I am hoping to get my first kiln late this summer or early this fall. Because of what I read years ago, I was going to build a separate 10 x 10 kiln shed. But, I notice from other forum posts that many of you have your kilns in the garage. We have a large 3 car garage and I could easily wall off a section for the kiln if I don’t have to worry about the kiln messing up the cars.

 

What are the risks of having a kiln in the garage with cars? It will be electric and will be vented to the outside.

 

Thanks,

Shannon

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Non vented, sulfur dioxide and trioxide would be of the biggest concern. Sulfur trioxide can form sulfuric acid acid when in contact with water vapor. That said, the amounts are very small, but there. If you are venting the kiln to the outside I would say not a problem.

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Shouldn't be a problem if it's vented. There have been reports of kiln gasses damaging car paint, but with a properly vented kiln it shouldn't be an issue. And as long as you have proper clearances and follow manufacturers recommendations on setting up the kiln, there aren't any other safety issues with putting the kiln in the garage.

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I have a window in my kiln room which is part of the garage, I built this small separate room about 7 years ago and the kilns are vented.  There is no sign of any glass damage on the window, we put concrete board half way up around the room.  My husband is considering going higher with it, I'm not sure what he thinks is going to happen.  I have been firing electric kilns for over 40 years haven't had a problem yet.    Denice

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Good suggestion Marcia, my insurance agent just wanted to know what the wiring was and the name of the electrician.  I asked him if he wanted to come out an inspect it and he said that I had kilns in my other garages and I knew what I was doing.    Denice

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Guest JBaymore

Watch gasoline fumes, gas cans, paint cans, solvents, and other flammables potentially in the same space.

 

Glazes high in fluorine compounds (impurity) are known to etch glass. Plus breathing fluorine is bad news.  Well vented kilns should not be an issue for this.

 

best,

 

..............john

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I'm not doing any special kinds of firing ... do I need to worry about fumes?

 

I plan to run an electric kiln to ^5 and ^6 in my garage. I don't keep my car in the garage and I will clear out all solvents and oil-based paints before I ever use the kilns once the studio is finished. After I fire I will probably keep the window and both doors open for awhile to air it out because I don't like the smell. 

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I'm not doing any special kinds of firing ... do I need to worry about fumes?

 

I plan to run an electric kiln to ^5 and ^6 in my garage. I don't keep my car in the garage and I will clear out all solvents and oil-based paints before I ever use the kilns once the studio is finished. After I fire I will probably keep the window and both doors open for awhile to air it out because I don't like the smell. 

 

Fumes come out in regular firings, especially during bisque when all the organic matter is burning out of the clay.

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I'm not doing any special kinds of firing ... do I need to worry about fumes?

 

I plan to run an electric kiln to ^5 and ^6 in my garage. I don't keep my car in the garage and I will clear out all solvents and oil-based paints before I ever use the kilns once the studio is finished. After I fire I will probably keep the window and both doors open for awhile to air it out because I don't like the smell. 

Just use a kiln vent and then it a non issue as far as fumes.

Mark

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Thanks for the responses.

 

I'm in the process of setting up my studio and I can't believe I never gave much thought to this! At least I'm thinking about it before I start using the kilns in there. 

I've just done some cramming on the subject and I guess what I planned to do was "crossdraft" venting by leaving the window open and a fan on, then thoroughly airing out the garage/studio before using it. I will look into a roof vent instead. Argh, an unplanned-for expense. I rent, so that adds another layer of complication; if this was my property I would just build a little kiln shed nearby. With the wiring situation that's not an option at all; as it is I'm paying myself to have a circuit run from the meter so I have the electricity to run the kilns. Currently I fire everything in my dad's kiln. Very time-consuming and stressful, especially to transport greenware across town. 

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  • 4 years later...
1 hour ago, Nancybee said:

Does anyone know how a glass-only electric kiln would be in the garage? Venting not typically required. Thoughts are appreciated!!

My suggestion would be to vent it, but my number one thought in your case would be to vent the heat as well to keep the garage habitable so a vent a kiln drop down hood or equivalent  is something I would suggest you contemplate.
 

Glass kilns are said to not off gas significantly but when the exhaust is turned off on our glass kilns in the studio complaints of smell usually reveals someone forgot to turn it on. I have to mention here in any vent installation there needs to be provision for outside air or makeup air to be available for the air exhausted. There are good ways to do this that comply with code and there is the hope that the door leaks enough approach. I suggest the former, not the latter.

A downdraft (fume only) approach probably designs out at about 50 cfm which requires a small provision for makeup air. A bigger system to remove much of the heat likely is in the 300-500 cfm range and requires decent attention to where and how you get your outside makeup air. 

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  • 9 months later...

I read the conversations but still have this question. 

With  my electronic  kiln in the garage and all solvents moved, Kim at least 18” away from walls and no automobiles, would having the 2-car garage door open be adequate venting? The water heater is in the garage but I could have the kiln a distance from it. 

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my kilns have been in a garage for about 18 years.   there are no windows in it, just a single door which i leave open.   i sometimes use a fan halfway between the kiln at the back wall and the front door.  that only moves some air out of the space.  i close the door to the rest of the studio and only look at the electronic reading occasionally.   some reasonable accomodations have been made toward safety.

once i have done my best, i may be stupid but i just do not worry about things that probably will not have a bad effect on me or my things.  

Edited by oldlady
clarity
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5 hours ago, Charleen said:

, would having the 2-car garage door open be adequate venting? The water heater is in the garage but I could have the kiln a distance from it. 

@Charleen Simple answer For air quality and decent oxidation put a kiln vent on it, minimum counterflow. If you want to remove the heat as well then put a hood above it. If you have a gas water heater make sure it has a source of combustion air. If you install a hood it will require decent outside air so as not to suck the fumes from  the water heater if gas of course.

Edited by Bill Kielb
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