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Attaching Porcelain To Plexiglass (Adhesive)


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Not much will hold onto plexi, and I wouldn't trust anything to hold on very well. I would look into a mechanical fastening system, like a bolt through the plexi. Be careful when drilling it, as it can crack. It helps to grind a sharper point/taper on the drill bit. Use a large washer on both sides of the bolt.

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Try roughing up the plexi where it won't show behind the piece. You might even try drilling a few shallow holes at a slight angle.  this will give the epoxy something to bond to.Rough up the back side of the  porcelain also. Epoxy will bond if it has a rough enough substrate. A glass artist here in Santa Fe used 5 min epoxy to  bonds 2" blocks of plexi to ten pound glass pieces and hangs them on the wall. I have done the same with ceramic sculptures.  I leave the area I am gong to bond unglazed, and it works fine.

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not sure if this will help, but i have glued larger flat raku pieces to wooden backing so they can be hung up.   I use marine epoxy putty called PC 7  (black)  or PC 11 (white).  its thick, gooey and kind of messy but works for what i do.  rakuku

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My rule of thumb is to use a mechanical fastener whenever possible. Adhesives will always fail at some point, unless they are made specifically for structural bonds. For instance, there are some architectural grade silicone adhesives that are approved to seal 2 pieces of window glass edge to edge, for a seamless appearance (I used to work for a commercial glass company), and even to hold glass windows in place. Adhesives for metals can also achieve incredibly strong, permanent bonds. There are some high end car frames that are held together with adhesives, because the bond is stronger and faster than welding.

 

But plastics- Plexiglas (acrylic), Lexan (polycarbonate), PVC (poly-vinyl chloride), HDPE (high density polyethylene (cutting boards)), nylon, etc. are an entirely different beast. We can glue two pieces of the same plastic together with a chemical adhesive that melts the plastic to form the bond with another piece of plastic. It's more akin to welding than gluing, though. The 'glue' actually evaporates away.  But attaching a different type of material to plastic is very difficult. Plastic is very smooth, and not at all porous, so adhesives have a very difficult time bonding with it. Even if you rough it up before gluing, you're relying on the glue to grab into tiny little cuts in the surface in order to hold. It's just not a strong bond. I have yet to hear of an adhesive that everyone agrees works well on plastics, which means that even if it works for you, it will likely fail at some point.

 

I have tried half a dozen different glues to attach plastic soap pump collars, and all have failed within 2 years, even those that people swear by. So now I use the cork stopper type.

 

I definitely would not trust silicone for long term adhesion. Notice how you have to re-caulk your bath tub every few years? It dries and shrinks over time, and loses its grip.

 

Ceramic pieces are permanent. They will last for hundreds of years or more. Use a fastening system that will last just as long.

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My rule of thumb is to use a mechanical fastener whenever possible. Adhesives will always fail at some point, unless they are made specifically for structural bonds. For instance, there are some architectural grade silicone adhesives that are approved to seal 2 pieces of window glass edge to edge, for a seamless appearance (I used to work for a commercial glass company), and even to hold glass windows in place. Adhesives for metals can also achieve incredibly strong, permanent bonds. There are some high end car frames that are held together with adhesives, because the bond is stronger and faster than welding.

 

But plastics- Plexiglas (acrylic), Lexan (polycarbonate), PVC (poly-vinyl chloride), HDPE (high density polyethylene (cutting boards)), nylon, etc. are an entirely different beast. We can glue two pieces of the same plastic together with a chemical adhesive that melts the plastic to form the bond with another piece of plastic. It's more akin to welding than gluing, though. The 'glue' actually evaporates away.  But attaching a different type of material to plastic is very difficult. Plastic is very smooth, and not at all porous, so adhesives have a very difficult time bonding with it. Even if you rough it up before gluing, you're relying on the glue to grab into tiny little cuts in the surface in order to hold. It's just not a strong bond. I have yet to hear of an adhesive that everyone agrees works well on plastics, which means that even if it works for you, it will likely fail at some point.

 

I have tried half a dozen different glues to attach plastic soap pump collars, and all have failed within 2 years, even those that people swear by. So now I use the cork stopper type.

 

I definitely would not trust silicone for long term adhesion. Notice how you have to re-caulk your bath tub every few years? It dries and shrinks over time, and loses its grip.

 

Ceramic pieces are permanent. They will last for hundreds of years or more. Use a fastening system that will last just as long.

Many thanks for responding.  I will definitely take your advice.  Oh, I have 2- L7L kilns and love them!

Joan

www.JRDStudio.artspan.com

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