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Wadding Use In Electric Kiln At Cone 6


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In my class we have to make a "cookie" of clay that is 1/4" bigger than the foot of our pot. We glue them to the bottom of our piece to catch any glaze that runs. these cookies can be used over and over if no glaze runs on them. If the cookie is too big, it is rejected until we get a smaller size. Maybe that is something you could have your students do.

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Why aren't they waxing and cleaning the bottoms of their pots?

That seems to be a better solution. Having taught for 25 years I think the

wodding to use on so many pieces every firing would be cost prohibitive. Have

them clean off the glaze with a sponge 1/4" up from the bottom and charge

them for ruining shelves. That's what they did where I was a student.

 

Marcia

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In my class we have to make a "cookie" of clay that is 1/4" bigger than the foot of our pot. We glue them to the bottom of our piece to catch any glaze that runs. these cookies can be used over and over if no glaze runs on them. If the cookie is too big, it is rejected until we get a smaller size. Maybe that is something you could have your students do.

 

 

Thank you!

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Why aren't they waxing and cleaning the bottoms of their pots?

That seems to be a better solution. Having taught for 25 years I think the

wodding to use on so many pieces every firing would be cost prohibitive. Have

them clean off the glaze with a sponge 1/4" up from the bottom and charge

them for ruining shelves. That's what they did where I was a student.

 

Marcia

 

 

 

They are waxing and wiping, but despite this, some students tend to be heavy handed and they cause drips (seems to always be the adult students...I have no problem with the kids :) also after researching the wading idea, I agree more work than what it's worth. I liked the "cookie" trays idea. I could use those for those pieces that scream glaze overload. Thanks for the input!

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I like the idea of cookies for odd shaped or larger pieces, but have found that 4" or 6" bisqued tiles--with kiln wash--work great. Had some left over from a project and they can be used and reused until something sticks to it. Getting the work off the tile becomes the students problem and my shelves are safe.

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I like the idea of cookies for odd shaped or larger pieces, but have found that 4" or 6" bisqued tiles--with kiln wash--work great. Had some left over from a project and they can be used and reused until something sticks to it. Getting the work off the tile becomes the students problem and my shelves are safe.

 

 

 

Thanks!

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I have known public studios to require cookies, the same as stated above. One of them requires the students to kiln wash the cookies. This allows them to reuse the cookies even when the glazes runs, most of the time. A recipe for kiln wash that I like and use, that also makes a usable wadding if thick enough,

 

1 part Silica

1 part alumina

1 part Kaolin (any)

 

2 to 3 % bentonite

 

Tom

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The art school I teach at has a "shelf of shame".....any pots that are glazed too heavily or the bottoms are not free of glaze go on the shelf and are not fired until they are cleaned up. Those pots not only ruin expensive shelves, but can run onto another students work and ruin it. It doesn't take but a time or two of their pots ending up on the shame shelf that they learn to glaze correctly.

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The art school I teach at has a "shelf of shame".....any pots that are glazed too heavily or the bottoms are not free of glaze go on the shelf and are not fired until they are cleaned up. Those pots not only ruin expensive shelves, but can run onto another students work and ruin it. It doesn't take but a time or two of their pots ending up on the shame shelf that they learn to glaze correctly.

 

 

The shelf of shame is a great idea, I wish schools were stricter with the students about the quality and quantity of there work. The first two throwing classes I took we could only keep three pieces to glaze and they were critiqued at the end of the semester. We also spent a lot of time cleaning and mixing clay and other studio chores. I returned to my alma mater 10 years after graduating and found they no longer practice these ideals. The Master students were unloading tons of obviously beginners work from the gas kilns the studio was a mess and the undergrads no longer made clay. I felt the students were being shorted in the development of discipline in ceramics, I know these were older students but I think this process can be started at a early age. Denice (Wichita, KS)

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Experience is important. Experience with discussion and reflection is even more useful. We learn a lot more from failures than successes. So I say protect the kiln, and other students pieces, and give them as much experience as you can.

 

"Shelf of shame" is an interesting concept. But I prefer more the cause and effect connection. There are pieces that derive their beauty from over glazing. The artists may have to work the piece a bit and have a bit of cleaning to do, but the results can be stunning.

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I like the idea of cookies for odd shaped or larger pieces, but have found that 4" or 6" bisqued tiles--with kiln wash--work great. Had some left over from a project and they can be used and reused until something sticks to it. Getting the work off the tile becomes the students problem and my shelves are safe.

 

 

The tile sounds like a great idea. How would it work to paint these with wax resist before sitting the piece on it? Would that protect both the piece and the tile? Win - Win maybe. Have limited experience with wax resist and didn't know how thoroughly it burns off and if the glaze would just end up sticking to the tile anyway.

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The art school I teach at has a "shelf of shame".....any pots that are glazed too heavily or the bottoms are not free of glaze go on the shelf and are not fired until they are cleaned up. Those pots not only ruin expensive shelves, but can run onto another students work and ruin it. It doesn't take but a time or two of their pots ending up on the shame shelf that they learn to glaze correctly.

 

 

This is also what the museum class I took did. The woman who loaded the kiln also had a little slip of paper with a list she checked off that had pre-written notes on why the piece was not fired. Things like glaze on bottom, glaze applied too heavily and a bunch of other stuff. We then took our pots back and fixed what was wrong. I thought it was a great idea.

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The art school I teach at has a "shelf of shame".....any pots that are glazed too heavily or the bottoms are not free of glaze go on the shelf and are not fired until they are cleaned up. Those pots not only ruin expensive shelves, but can run onto another students work and ruin it. It doesn't take but a time or two of their pots ending up on the shame shelf that they learn to glaze correctly.

 

 

The shelf of shame is a great idea, I wish schools were stricter with the students about the quality and quantity of there work. The first two throwing classes I took we could only keep three pieces to glaze and they were critiqued at the end of the semester. We also spent a lot of time cleaning and mixing clay and other studio chores. I returned to my alma mater 10 years after graduating and found they no longer practice these ideals. The Master students were unloading tons of obviously beginners work from the gas kilns the studio was a mess and the undergrads no longer made clay. I felt the students were being shorted in the development of discipline in ceramics, I know these were older students but I think this process can be started at a early age. Denice (Wichita, KS)

 

 

I agree I recently worked in two studios one was a local museum and one was the local state college. The local museum had strict studio rules and we all cleaned and followed the rules for the clay and kiln room. (or else more or less) When I got to the college I was a bit surprised at the amount of breakage and the messes left behind. I initially attributed it to the fact that the college had younger students than the museum but realized that things were just a bit more disorganized and procedures left a lot of leeway and hence the issue of breakage and glaze contamination with other glazes and a variety of other issues. I was actually rather pleased I had taken the museum class first because I developed better habits for my own studio which will minimize mistakes and issues to solve. If I had taken the college studio class first lots of bad habits would have developed and I would have spent more time figuring out where I was going wrong and it would have been procedure.

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I completely see the point in your question. It's a smart craftsman should always have several answers to common problems. I haunt different potters kilns as often as I can and it's forced me to get into the habit of using wadding in all cases, even in my own cone 6 electric.

No problem.

By mixing up a small batch and keeping it wrapped up and in tupperware is keeps just fine for months. As far as cost goes, it's cheap, less than 3 bucks a batch and it will save hundreds of dollars worth of work from becoming worthless. Well worth the effort and cost.

Ceramic Arts Daily has an article with a tried and tested wadding recipe that works great and knocks off easily. Here's the link...

The only difference is that I don't prefire the wads like they do in the article, just use it like normal wads and call it good.

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I have known public studios to require cookies, the same as stated above. One of them requires the students to kiln wash the cookies. This allows them to reuse the cookies even when the glazes runs, most of the time. A recipe for kiln wash that I like and use, that also makes a usable wadding if thick enough,

 

1 part Silica

1 part alumina

1 part Kaolin (any)

 

2 to 3 % bentonite

 

Tom

 

 

 

Thanks! Will keep this!

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I completely see the point in your question. It's a smart craftsman should always have several answers to common problems. I haunt different potters kilns as often as I can and it's forced me to get into the habit of using wadding in all cases, even in my own cone 6 electric.

No problem.

By mixing up a small batch and keeping it wrapped up and in tupperware is keeps just fine for months. As far as cost goes, it's cheap, less than 3 bucks a batch and it will save hundreds of dollars worth of work from becoming worthless. Well worth the effort and cost.

Ceramic Arts Daily has an article with a tried and tested wadding recipe that works great and knocks off easily. Here's the link...

The only difference is that I don't prefire the wads like they do in the article, just use it like normal wads and call it good.

 

 

 

Thank you! I meant to use the wadding only on those wares that I felt could cause damage to kiln shelf....If I wadded only those heavily glazed wares, shelf would be fine, and piece would be fine...thanks for the link!

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  • 4 years later...

I make cookies by rolling out a slab, cutting circles, then drop the round clay over 3 - 5 oiled decorative marbles used in flower arranging as they are flat on one side.  I press the clay onto the marbles and pinch small cones over the marbles as standoffs.  I then fire to bisque and kiln wash them heavily.  The pointed cookies makes it easy to pop pieces off when glaze comes in contact with the point.  Attached is a pic.

 

 

post-67087-0-75509200-1446163982_thumb.jpg

post-67087-0-75509200-1446163982_thumb.jpg

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  • 4 years later...

welcome to the forums!   lots of good info here but  the more description you include in your question, the faster and better the answers will be.  name of clay, cone of its maturity,  decorative or functional, etc..

you have not included in the description of your work whether or not you glaze the bottoms of your pieces.   if you do, stilts or the cookies hulk shows above will work.

i hope you have made up some kiln wash, the recipe given above has been improved over the years.  calcining half of the EPK, Kaolin, makes a better wash.  no bentonite.  i applied it years ago and have not had any chipping off.   a search for the recipe from Mark C might show it, i can't get to the studio right now for my copy.

Edited by oldlady
correction
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