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DMCosta

Slab Roller Recommendations

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The Bailey tabletop model is extremely heavy (70+ lbs in one piece) so it's not easy to move out of the way if you have a small work space.  The similar size North Star tabletop model is a little more expensive, but extremely portable (50 lbs) and it comes apart in 3 sections that easily fit on a small rolling dolly under a table when not in use. And the North Star allows for slabs of infinitely variable thickness unlike a shim-board style roller. 

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I have a Bailey 24" roller coming next week based upon the comments in this post.  For the price it seemed like a good deal and had free shipping which adds up on heavy items.  Boy am I ever spending a lot of $$$ getting set up for pottery.

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thanks for reviving it.

 

 i never knew that mug's assumption that the bailey has only one roller was not corrected.  mine is a long table, 24 inch wide, double rollers, reversible directions, heavy duty bailey slab roller.  it came with an 8 foot long canvas to be folded while making a slab.  i do not know if they make them only 24 inches wide anymore.  i got mine in 1991 and i think it was on sale then as going to be discontinued.  

 

mug, the rollers contact the bottom side of the board specially coated with a rubberish compound so the roller grips it and pushes it through.  mine has the same board as it did when i bought it.  i keep the tabletop clean, always use the surface for many activities but wash and dry it before using the rollers to flatten clay.  it is a drive board model.  i don't think i have ever lifted the drive board off the table to look at the rubbery stuff.  it helps that i rarely have anyone else in my studio to mess it up.  everyone who does use it has learned not to leave tiny crumbs anywhere so they don't get caught in the rollers.  there are 2 crumb boxes attached to the table, one at each end.

 

it is not a Formica surface, it is something less permanent but definitely not Formica or one of its sisters.  you can cut it with a knife.

 

bioman, yes, you can spend a lot but do it while thinking "does this item in the pottery supply catalog come from any other source for less $$$"

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I'm considering the Bailey 22" that's on sale with free shipping. Seems like the most reasonable.

I'm having a 16" hump mold for reverse throwing made.

But I'm wondering if 22" would be enough to make the 16" +  curve I'll need for the mold.

Hmmm... maybe I should just do it the old school way and use a rolling pin. ;)

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