Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ginny C

Good Glazes For Breaking On Heavy Texture

Recommended Posts

I've discovered that the Spectrum glaze called Textured Kiwi Fruit breaks into three colors over deeply incised patterns. I love it and want to ask if anyone knows of other commercial glazes that break this nicely.  Here's a photo:  (I hope... I've had to shrink it so small I don't know if the colors will be evident.)

Does anyone know of others that would break this effectively but in other color families?

 

post-1066-0-86621300-1425152416_thumb.png

 

 

post-1066-0-86621300-1425152416_thumb.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure on commercial glazes but I would think adding 2-5% rutile to a glaze would give some of what you are looking for.

 

I have a base transparent that I add 1% cobalt carb and 5% rutile that is blue/green textured where thick and breaks to brown where thin because of the rutile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a nice glaze.. Amaco has a line called Potters Choice cone 5-6, for short PC.. They are called "float glazes"  and really take to layering ...

 

 

Have you tried that glaze on a more vertical form? Im wondering if you would get similar results, on a flat/textured surface PC glazes will break/float and pool very nice.. On slick vertical surfaces it will float and you get different colors from it.. I have 1 glaze I get about 5 colors from... hard to tame by  itself though, but works good with a under coat...

 

 

Her glaze is ^4-6 / Spectrum calls it a reactive glaze ... Really similar to Amaco's PC Float glazes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spectrum makes quite a few "textured" glazes like Kiwi Fruit.  Just google spectrum textured glazes and you will see them.  I use about a dozen different one's and they are excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's see.  I fire to cone 5 or 6 in an electric kiln. Currently using Laguna's B-Mix cone five.  This glaze (Spectrum's Textured Kiwi Fruit) is also lovely on flat surfaces, where it is a subtle mixture of the green and blue, but on the deep texture, it is quite different. The outside of the pictured dish is entirely different.  I have used a lot of commercial glazes and I often layer them, but I haven't seen quite this distinct separating into several colors emphasizing the carved details.  Many of the reactive glazes do show more than one color, but not so precisely.   There...that's a lot of words, but I hope you see what I'm after.   Of course I could make lots of textured tiles and buy lots more glazes and try them all out...but I'd much rather ask for others to report their experiences here!!   :)   Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alot of cone 5-6 glazes break over texture. Amaco's potter's choice for sure. Some lagunas do also but not advertised as such its a trial and error. A lot of coyote glazes break also. There a few spectrum glazes i like but quite a few run too much so use care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I first started out, I used a number of the Laguna Morroccan Sand glazes.  Many of the glazes would change when breaking.  Unfortunetly most of the sample test tiles on the websites don't show it very well.  One glaze I esp. liked was Cappacino.  It was finiky, didn't work on anything with high iron in it, but very beautiful. These are very affordable, esp. if purchased dry.  Axner had the best pricing I could find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.