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Alternative Firing Workshop S.padre Is. Art Space 2/18/2015


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Here are some pictures and results of the participants  from the workshop. Went to the Palms' .St Pier for late lunch since we fired the last pieces around 2. We fired the two kilns for a total of 11 firings for Obvara, horse hair and feathers, saggar and raku.

 

Coconut Shrimp was great. The Shrimp nachos looked good too.

 

Marcia

I think the Palm Street Pier was having a wake in the bar. I whole line of oldsters shuffled by doing the "locomotion" and a live singer was singing Amazing Grace when we left. Wild place! At our friend, Pete's,funeral the Shriners played Amazing Grace on Kazoos. There wasn't a straight face in the house!

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  • 3 weeks later...

There is about a ten minute window of opportunity while primitive

pottery is cooling down which designs can be drawn on vessels with

organic matter. Ethnohistorians wrote about the Cherokee potters

doing that with turkey feathers, in the early to mid-18th century.

Vessel temperature needs to be between about 600 to 800 degrees F.

Their maximum temps could only be 951 F.

 

Your feather pot is impressive because of the sharp image. My favorite is the

happy fish plaque.

Alabama

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Hey,

Have you tried different types of flours and such, or

are the results too good to mess with? It would be interesting

to see what 1/2 to one cup of cornmeal added to the batch on

the last vessel of the day would do.

Carol Spindle wrote an article in Ceramics Monthly 1990,

about African pottery of the Ivory Coast. There they boil

large amounts of tree bark to make a solution of tannic acid,

so they can dip the smaller vessels in to taint them a tannish

color with dark brown splotches. The reason I mention this is

your techniques are close, just different liquid solutions. There again

what would happen if you combined the two and added your flour and sugar

to a tannic acid solution? Acorns have lots of tannic acid in them,

and all that is required to get it, is to soak them. You might want to

see Carol's article, then ponder about the two methods. I think it is the tannic

acid that makes the light brown patina and tannic oils floating on top that

create the dark brown blotches.

See ya,

Alabama

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I do try different flours This time I used Stone ground hard red wheat. The temperature differential is critical. I had difficulty with some of the bigger pieces but eventually managed. Unfortunately they were time consuming and had to reheat the remaining pieces in each batch. I am not familiar with carol's article. I had all the CMs from the early 70s on. I gave them to my college when I retired because I assumed the CDs would be coming. They only got to the 1970s.

I am exploring the wheat/yeast brew and that is plenty to keep me busy. But I will watch for a way to read about her information.

 

Thanks,

Marcia

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----I will watch for a way to read about her information.---

 

Thanks,

Marcia

 

The author is Carol Spindle, the title is Potters of the Ivory Coast,

pgs., 54 - 60. Ceramics Monthly, Sept., 1990 I have a xeroxed copy,

if you can't find one. It's one of the better articles on the subject.

See ya,

Alabama

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