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What's The Most Risque Out There Thing You've Done In Clay.....


jolieo

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Or how far have you pushed the limits?

So I saw JBaymore's vessel made from Yunomi clay with granite inclusions. Wow!

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/3293-yakishime-yunomi-with-nh-granite-inclusions/#comment_1243

 

I can relate to wondering theoretically how such a thing could be done,but doing it? I can only hope so.

That this incredible piece was wheel thrown amazes me to no end, no less that he fired it several times to get the granite to melt. I am in awe.

 So if I hadn't chanced upon it, I would have never known!

 Please share your secrets. I am dying to know. Jolie

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Omg...I totally thought this was a, uh, thread of a different sort, hahaha!! "Risqué" and "risky," lmao!! :D

Let's see...

Well, my first sculpture was a guinea pig whose head blew off in the kiln. :D I slopped a mix of some ball clay and glaze to try and glue him back together, and it worked! I wish I had a pic...

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My first ceramics professor in college always made his 1st year students mix random things in clay, make something out of it and fire it. People put rice, nails, rocks, glass etc. Nothing blew up. I think I made a weird head with rice which just burns out and leaves a little texture. He also once heated a large rock in a rake kiln, pulled it out red hot then smashed it with a sledge hammer. I have no idea what the point of that was.

 

For me the most risky thing was probably the teapot in my gallery. It was an experiment, and I had no clue really how to do the bottom. I learned from trying to make it though so if I should like to try something like that again it will be better.

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In my earliest clay class we were asked to experiment with all sorts of additives to the clay body (i.e. sawdust, leaves, twigs, lemon peels, etc.).   A lot of those worked and really loosened up the way we approached projects.  I made a cylinder from an earthenware mix that included sawdust and poked nails into it to the extent that it gained a porcupine look.  That piece actually survived the bisque firing without a crack...the nails did show some serious signs of oxidation.  During the low glaze firing, the nails slumped enough that it looked more like some sort of weird conifer.  I haven't tried that since then.

 

On the risque side...all I have to say is that some of my work has a Mayan influence...and that particular culture wasn't shy about anatomically exaggerated fertility objects.

 

-Paul

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A couple of years ago I tried a slightly different shape for a lamp base and didn't realize until it was fired what it resembled.  Since it was a lamp base it had a hole in the top and I used standard 112 which is pink in bisque state.  I'll leave the rest to your imagination.  It's still sitting in my studio unglazed.  In fact, I had a conversation with my family when they were here over the holidays and they were laughinly helping me decide what to do.  Embrace it, disguise it, or pitch it....

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I did some risque pieces at PSU in the 70's, inspiration after a slip party(untold story). These were vases and jars with decoration of blue jeans tightly conforming to the anatomy.

 

My riskiest piece was in 2008 when I decided to maybe retire. I made a jar with lid that sat on a 3 legged pedestal that was pretty thin. My promise to myself was if it survived and was acceptable in all respects then I would retire. If not, wait a few years. At the time I had 36 in, and could have gone at 35. The pieces survived and I retired. I really hated being out my first two years, but it allowed me to work on getting my health back and start travels with my wife. We have done  quite a bit since then and hope to do much more.

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The most fun I have had with a risky project ...

I was so tired of worrying about cracks and defects in my porcelain work that I decided to cure myself by pushing the clay to its limits and letting whatever happen without any interference from me..

I did a series I called "Nautilus Imperfect".

The Nautilus shell is one of nature's most perfect shapes totally illustrating the "Golden Mean" or "Pi" ... so I made a large cane of one out of colored clay.

Then I smashed old work that had 'imperfections', rolled the shards in a rock tumbler to smooth the pieces, then wedged these chunks into my porcelain. I then made pieces combining the Natutilus slices with the chunky clay and just let them sit out to dry. I watched as the stress cracks appeared ... normally a crazy making time for me ... but just let it be.

The resulting work did not sell well as almost nobody wanted cracked work, but some of the pieces remain my favorites to this day.

AND as a bonus, it worked. (Well, mostly :wub: ) I am somewhat looser now and more apt to allow the clay to lead the way

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post-1585-0-23638300-1423584304_thumb.jpg

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 He also once heated a large rock in a rake kiln, pulled it out red hot then smashed it with a sledge hammer. I have no idea what the point of that was.

 

 

 

Was there a photographer there?  If so, the purpose was that he was making a Heavy Metal album cover...

 

I've never done anything terribly risque.  Some of my sculptures have had small attachment points, and intricate pieces, but that's about it.  

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Well I have made some items with a risky subject matter. Like a polar bear being crucified and a whale being crucified and also an elephant.  I was worried some in our gallery would object to the first one but no one had a problem. also a polar bear pushing a shopping cart of homeless animals.  they all sold quickly.  guess that tells me something. rakuku

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I did some risque pieces at PSU in the 70's, inspiration after a slip party(untold story). These were vases and jars with decoration of blue jeans tightly conforming to the anatomy.

 

My riskiest piece was in 2008 when I decided to maybe retire. I made a jar with lid that sat on a 3 legged pedestal that was pretty thin. My promise to myself was if it survived and was acceptable in all respects then I would retire. If not, wait a few years. At the time I had 36 in, and could have gone at 35. The pieces survived and I retired. I really hated being out my first two years, but it allowed me to work on getting my health back and start travels with my wife. We have done  quite a bit since then and hope to do much more.

Now you have to tell the story- tight jeans and slip? Sounds like a good time!! ;)

 

Notice truth in advertising- the forum labeled this topic as "HOT" 

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A well known artist/professor decided we needed to experiment with seeing how everyday items would look if made of clay. For the exercise, he had two 50 gallon barrels full of silky smooth gray slip. He also had a couple of large boxes of toys, household items etc. We started out dipping these in the slip, letting them dry, redipping etc. So an hour into the class, he conveniently/inconveniently got called away to a departmental meeting. An hour later and there were at least 1/2 dozen folks running around campus au natural covered in slip, head to toe. This was photographed by a few folks that had cameras and there was an incident where a family leaving the famous creamery lost their cones out of shock! Ended up with pictures in the slop bathtub, one large kiln had a table and chairs loaded into it as a tea party setting. In the end, quite a rise on campus. Remember at the same time that this was in the pre-cell, pre-digital era of the 70's. Maybe one last hang over from those wild 60's that I really didn't ever see.

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