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How To Paint A Commercial Tile And Refire For Durability


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Hello. Am new to ceramic fun!! Replacing ceramic tiles in our kitchen. Bought Dal Periwinkle matte tiles. Bought Duncan E-Z Stroke. Painted on them. Used Duncan Clear Satin Glaze. Did some samples -low fire on 05 cone at a local place,  which changed the background-the Perwinkle to a light blue, yet the painted colors stayed true.  Then did the same for my final firing, painting on the Clear Satin Glaze which pulled the colors across the tile. They are ruined and not worth firing. I am in the process of painting more (have lots of extra tiles!) .

Wondering if it would be better to fire on low to keep the paintings in place, then a second low  firing with the satin glaze? Or sponge the satin glaze over the paintings rather than brush. 

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Hello. Am new to ceramic fun!! Replacing ceramic tiles in our kitchen. Bought Dal Periwinkle matte tiles. Bought Duncan E-Z Stroke. Painted on them. Used Duncan Clear Satin Glaze. Did some samples -low fire on 05 cone at a local place,  which changed the background-the Perwinkle to a light blue, yet the painted colors stayed true.  Then did the same for my final firing, painting on the Clear Satin Glaze which pulled the colors across the tile. They are ruined and not worth firing. I am in the process of painting more (have lots of extra tiles!) .

Wondering if it would be better to fire on low to keep the paintings in place, then a second low  firing with the satin glaze? Or sponge the satin glaze over the paintings rather than brush. 

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Thanks for replying Stephen, but since the topic was about how to paint a commercial tile rather than using China paints, I posed my question. 

To all of you on this feed, would love an answer or even a conversation about my question. With a commercial tile that already has been fired and can be used as is, is it best to fire that after painting (with underglazes), and then a second time with the final clear glaze or better to paint, apply the satin glaze when paint is dry and do just one firing? 

thank you!!

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17 minutes ago, Gloria Halper said:

Thanks for replying Stephen, but since the topic was about how to paint a commercial tile rather than using China paints, I posed my question. 

To all of you on this feed, would love an answer or even a conversation about my question. With a commercial tile that already has been fired and can be used as is, is it best to fire that after painting (with underglazes), and then a second time with the final clear glaze or better to paint, apply the satin glaze when paint is dry and do just one firing? 

thank you!!

I think everyone has been doing their best to provide some ideas. To answer your question specifically if I were using already made tiles and I was dead set on painting with underglazes then I suggest, paint carefully and  lowfire to sinter. Not sure if this will make the underglaze  stick to your tile but it likely should as the parent glaze softens and your new underglaze sinters. Next I would spray clear lowfire glaze evenly and lowfire again to finish. 
 

doing this all in one single  firing would likely tend to smear your underglaze so the two firing method likely gives the best chance for undisturbed success.. Of course that is assuming you are painting something other than a clean background color on your tiles. In Either case, spray applying clear glaze has a better chance of going on evenly and likely disturbs the underglaze the least.

thats my best idea at the moment.

 

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38 minutes ago, Gloria Halper said:

With a commercial tile that already has been fired and can be used as is, is it best to fire that after painting (with underglazes), and then a second time with the final clear glaze or better to paint, apply the satin glaze when paint is dry and do just one firing? 

Since the tiles are already glazed I would try the Duncan E-Z Stroke and fire with no covering glaze. If they look satisfactory to you after firing  try scrubbing them to make sure they are really bonded with the glaze. I like Bills option too.

From Duncan: "Over a Glaze (Majolica Technique)  - E-Z Stroke colors can be used effectively over unfired non-moving glazes and then fired to witness cone 06. Designs, patterns or scenes can be painted over nonmoving glazes. The E-Z Stroke colors should be thinned with water or Thin ‘n Shade to a consistency no heavier than light cream and applied in one or two light coats rather than a heavy coat. Too heavy or too think an application may produce a textured effect or blisters on the color area. Unusual effects can also be obtained when E-Z Strokes are applied over flowing glazes such as glosses. The colors will change somewhat in tone depending on the choice of color glaze used, the shape of the bisque piece, and the cone to which it is fired. As the glaze flows during the firing, the E-Z Strokes will also flow, creating one-of-a-kind effects."

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Migt need to add a medium which will allow the underglaze to sit on a fired glazed surface.

Same with most glazes.

Testing really in the only way. Prior to wasting time with underglazes spray your  glazed com. tile and fire to see how they marry.

If totally underglazing surface and then glazing suggest buying unglazed tiles......

Edited by Babs
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gloria,   there is a difference in using UNDERglaze on a tile that already has GLAZE on it and using a GLAZE ON TOP of a glazed tile.   try Mayco Stroke & Coat glaze which is made to do what you want.   it is a GLAZE so do not cover it with a separate GLAZE.   just do your painting and fire it once.

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5 hours ago, Bill Kielb said:

I think everyone has been doing their best to provide some ideas. To answer your question specifically if I were using already made tiles and I was dead set on painting with underglazes then I suggest, paint carefully and  lowfire to sinter. Not sure if this will make the underglaze  stick to your tile but it likely should as the parent glaze softens and your new underglaze sinters. Next I would spray clear lowfire glaze evenly and lowfire again to finish. 
 

doing this all in one single  firing would likely tend to smear your underglaze so the two firing method likely gives the best chance for undisturbed success.. Of course that is assuming you are painting something other than a clean background color on your tiles. In Either case, spray applying clear glaze has a better chance of going on evenly and likely disturbs the underglaze the least.

thats my best idea at the moment.

 

 

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Thank you all who responded to my question!  Am very grateful! Will try a first firing of my painting on my commercial tiles, and then a second firing with a clear glaze.

I wish I had known about Mayco Stroke & Coat glaze--certainly will look into this product!! Appreciated reading each reply--learned something from each of you!! gratefully, gloria

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