Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
High Bridge Pottery

The Double Dip

Recommended Posts

I had never seen anything like this technique, after trying it out on a few pots I love it. Firing is on now so the final verdict will be found out tomorrow but it really speeds up my glazing. 

 

Thought I would share to educate anybody else who has missed out. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, making a vacuum seal ... reminds me of trying to siphon water out of a fish tank, for some reason :unsure: ..but I wonder about the strain on the wrist over time (tho that might be my aging limbs speaking). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My ONLY skepticism is focused on the touch-up on the rim where the submerged finger supported the mug for dipping.  My efforts to repair/touch-up finger touch points is pretty dismal...nice even glaze all over, then that one spot where I attempted to glaze a finger hold.  And yes, I make sure to scrub oily fingers before dipping...but that is not going to keep me from trying this technique, I generally do another dip of the rim in another glaze anyway.

 

-Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just took my double dipped pots out the kiln and I can't even find where my finger touch up was without looking very hard. I did add an extra fast dunk about 0.5cm up the pot to smooth out the touch up and I find the rims always seem to suck up less glaze anyway and need a little extra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone on here (apologies for not remembering who) dips their pots while holding the foot-ring, and doesn't mind (or even likes) the three-finger missing spots of glaze.  I think if you get them balanced, it does make a feature.

 

Also, if I was dipping like Simon Leach does, I think I'd have to have the rim finger opposite the handle, so if there is a touch-up mark it wouldn't be where your mouth would be on a mug.  Thinks some more.........  Or even right by the handle, but then that wouldn't work for mugs, only smaller cups.  Unless you have huge hands.

 

Ohhh To need enough glaze to fill a bucket....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spray the insides with my glaze jet. Leaves a perfect lip edge

You can make your own as I pupblished the plans in studio potter volume #36 #2

After wrist surgery the jecky movement would kill me now.

The glaze jet is made for 5 galloon buckets.-its the best way to handle hundreds of mugs or any interiors for that matter. We use a few each week.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried the intentional finger marks but never fell in love with them. Never seemed to look very good. I do remember the post you are talking about but my memory is just as bad at finding the name of said potter.

 

You can't even see the touch up and this glaze doesn't move at all. My only problem has been the bottom of the inside is slightly uneven but more practise and I should have it down.

 

Anything taller than 13cm and I am struggling but I have big man hands.

 

I am imagining the glaze jet like those things you can get to clean beer glasses by placing them upside down an spraying a jet of water. Am I close?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No idea about a beer glass cleaner.

The glaze jet is PVC clamps to bucket side and has a plunger which will squirt glaze straight up when depressed. Hold pot over tube and squirt.Its really for high volume glaze useers.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JBaymore

Nothing particularly new there for anyone who has been "around a while".  Learned this technique about 1967-68 in Ceramics 1.

 

I use it all the time, but I grasp the foot area, not the foot and lip.  If you design the piece well...... there IS a place to grip the foot for this purpose.

 

I also sometimes on certain pieces allow the finger marks from gripping the piece to show as "decorations of process".  I also do "yubigaki"..... finger wipes in the wet glazes frequently.

 

best,

 

...................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you always plan in advance how you are going to glaze your stuff? Cause I don't and I often end up glazing stuff in a very messy way. Like bowl without foot I find very hard to glaze on the outside as you kind of have to dip it twice. Or maybe there is a secret technique I don't know :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you always plan in advance how you are going to glaze your stuff? Cause I don't and I often end up glazing stuff in a very messy way. Like bowl without foot I find very hard to glaze on the outside as you kind of have to dip it twice. Or maybe there is a secret technique I don't know :)

 

Find a large bowl, larger than the item you want to glaze, place two dowel rods (or any thin sticks) across the bowl, place the pot to be glazed upside down on the sticks, pour glaze over pot from a jug.

 

You'll need to touch up the rim,  (the dowels provide a smaller area of contact compared to flat sticks).

 

You may want to give a gentle rub over with your finger  if the glaze has overlapped at the start/finish point.

 

You wont get it right first time.  ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh yea I agree spray gun is magical!! But as I don't have my own studio, I have to use what is available! Thanks for the advice Ayjay, I never thought about just pouring the glaze over, I guess it works too! I'll try that next time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.