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Hi all

 

I've seen a beautiful piece at the IAC member exhibition in Dublin. On the tag it said "dry glaze". Can somebody tell me how to apply and fire dry glaze and where to buy it (here in Switzerland there is no dry glaze available).

 

Thank you in advance. Greetings

 

Evelyne

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Guest JBaymore

Evelyne,

 

Could have been an X language to English mis-translation like Neil is suggesting above. Matt glazes in English are sometimes refered to as "dry" .... meaning the surface has no gloss.

 

Also there is a technique where dry glaze powder is applied directly to wet freshly made work. Believe this or not... certain early lead glazed ware was dust glazed like this!!!! You put the dry glaze mixture in a porous cloth bag and beat it against the wet clay piece. It produces a thin and somewhat organic look. VERY dangerous due to the airborne stuff.

 

best,

 

.....................john

 

PS: A lot ogf great work in that IAC show wasn't there?

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Thank you bsiskepottery for the link! Will have a look if this helps.

 

Neil: I don't know whether it was only matt glaze. It looked a lot like velvet. But it was matt, yes.

 

Hey John, how are you doing? Yes, beautiful work in the exhibition. Maybe you saw the piece I'am talking about: it was mounted on the last pilaster in the room in direction of the coffee room, to the right. It looks like a big round wavy collar. It is possible that the Lady who did it used the second technique you describe. Awwww, let me find a picture of the piece or else the name of the artist. Will be back soon...

 

Thank you all for answering!

 

Evelyne

 

PS: I couldn't download the picture, so John, I'll send it to you by email. I hope that's ok with you. Thank you!

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Hi Evelyne

 

http://www.simonefraser.com.au/home/index.php/galleries/gallery-2013#

 

The link shows the work of Australian potter Simone Fraser who is very well known for her dry glazes, they look like velvet being only slightly more fluxed than a coloured slip.

They are very often made with barium and a whole lot of highly toxic materials that Simone has developed a whole safety routine around.

 

She was one of my lecturers at my first college and the surfaces of her work close up are quite mesmerising. She layers, sands back, layers and refires several times to achieve that multi coloured, multi layered 'abstract' surface in a dry velvet finish. They are beautiful pieces.  She tells people that the work is dry glazed and talks about her process though I don't think she has ever released her own specific recipies. There are many published ones in the pottery magazines to try. I have a beautiful barium velvet sky blue but I rarely make or use it....definitley NOT food safe and very expensive to make.....but VERY pretty!

 

Irene

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If you're dealing with non-functional work, then all the rules for food safety are unnecessary. if you don't want to work with barium, a glaze can be made dry by increasing the alumina content to the point that it's no longer melting completely and forming good glass. This is essentially how underglazes work- not quite a glaze, but not a slip. You could even do something like a line blend of a glaze and calcined kaolin. Another option is a high magnesium glaze that is slow cooled to create a matte surface.

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If you're dealing with non-functional work, then all the rules for food safety are unnecessary. if you don't want to work with barium, a glaze can be made dry by increasing the alumina content to the point that it's no longer melting completely and forming good glass. This is essentially how underglazes work- not quite a glaze, but not a slip. You could even do something like a line blend of a glaze and calcined kaolin. Another option is a high magnesium glaze that is slow cooled to create a matte surface.

Is there a discernable difference in the mattes obtained, Neil? Durablility? Appearance? The effects on the colourants would come into the picture too.

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If you're dealing with non-functional work, then all the rules for food safety are unnecessary. if you don't want to work with barium, a glaze can be made dry by increasing the alumina content to the point that it's no longer melting completely and forming good glass. This is essentially how underglazes work- not quite a glaze, but not a slip. You could even do something like a line blend of a glaze and calcined kaolin. Another option is a high magnesium glaze that is slow cooled to create a matte surface.

Is there a discernable difference in the mattes obtained, Neil? Durablility? Appearance? The effects on the colourants would come into the picture too.

 

 

Magnesium mattes are a great way to get a durable matte surface, and you can control the degree of matteness via cooling cycles. Dry mattes that are under-fired are not generally durable or food safe because they're not fully melting and forming good glass. I would think that colorants would be more vibrant in a fully formed glass, but since you're not dealing with food safety in under-fired mattes, you could just put a ton of colorants in to get deep colors, like they do with underglazes.

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Thank you for the link. Beautiful work. I wonder how she creates the coral reef texture.

 

 

 

 

Hi Evelyne

 

Yes her work is genuinely beautiful and very, very 'touchable'.....the indentations for her original work were done by throwing a cylinder, pushing out the 'belly' of the pot from the inside while standing up to reach one hand into the pot for structural support (some of the pots are quite large!)

....then slowly revolving the wheel by hand while using a finger to push hundreds of dents outwards from the inside the pot starting at the bottom and working her way up the pot walls, the current work I have not seen made but looks pinched from the outside with fingers while supporting the wall structure inside with the other hand

 

We all tried to emulate her work while at university but it is patient work and much harder to do than it looks!!

 

Irene

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Babs: the one I was talking about was very matt indeed. John thinks that the artist used really dry (powder) glaze and that IMO is a bit dangerous for the lungs!

 

Irene: thank you muches for the link! The one in your post is passing me to an error page. When I google Simon Fraser I also get an error page. How did you guys get to her Website? I would be very interested in this artist. Thank you once again!

 

Neil: thank you for all the interesting information. If I try matt glaze/dry glaze, it would be on a non-functional piece!

 

The artist I saw that piece in Dublin is Gloria Carrasco of Mexico. I converted the picture and I hope you can see it now.

 

Thanks again for all your help!

 

Evelyne

post-6433-0-84376300-1411562812_thumb.jpg

post-6433-0-84376300-1411562812_thumb.jpg

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Irene,

 

Thank you. Hard to imagine how she managed to keep the vase standing up while making so many holes (esp., starting from the base). Also, did she work separately with the edges of each hole? How?

 

Mike

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