Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
synj00

Thickening Iron Oxide

Recommended Posts

I want to make a thicker iron oxide for brushing onto my pieces. First off its a complete mess when mixed with water. Second all the iron particles end up at the bottom unless you are continually stirring which still makes for an inconsistent tone and tint of the application. What is the general rule for getting suspension of particles in a water based stain / glaze / etc... a frit? I'm firing at cone 6 always and cone 04 for bisque. The application will be on bisqueware not greenware.

 

p7010070.jpg?w=640&h=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Synn;

You don't want to be using fritts. Fritts are basically ground glass and are heavy.

You want to be adding clay to your mix for suspension.

I add Albany slip-one teaspoon to about a tablespoon of red Iron Oxide.

Not precise-just spoon in, mix up and brush.

Some potters use a mortar and pestle to get a fine grind, but I can't be bothered.

Also try a bit of black iron oxide to taste.

Check out my gallery for brush work.

TJR.

The fifth image is unfired iron.

T.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iron is heavy

 

Not a suggestion but questions... What about flocs, Epsom salts, or bentonite?

 

My applications of rio just tended to get eaten up by glaze or clay, leaving faint brown line nothing like what you have in picture which. Was my original intent.

 

I did make a signature rio mix with 3134 and rio, but that also settled like mad. After shaking and opening container it looked like scene from dexter.

 

(Good pot, by the way!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Biglou13 and thanks for the suggestion of clay. The black I got was from letting the iron settle to the bottom of my "watery suspension" pouring off the clear and applying the thick sludge of iron from the bottom. This is the reason for the original question. It leaves the application very inconsistent and never repeatable (sometimes good but...) I'll try the clay slurry idea and heck, maybe even in a ketchup squeeze bottle it might be interesting to keep on hand. Can always thin it too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since oxide washes are mostly water and the water is what spreads the wash around, you can thicken the water with Xanthum gum.  1-3 tsp of gum to 16 ounces of fluid, followed by shaking vigorously will thicken the water soln and suspend the RIO.  The xanthum gum burns out in the firing.  I have used it for a while.  I don't know if anyone else has done this before.  But I found it works for me.  Its biggest drwback is that it is an organic material and will go bad.  So make up small batches you will use quickly.

 

Jed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest JBaymore

For cone 10 and up, I use a mix of RIO, a tiny bit of redart (particles for helping suspension), small amount of g-200 spar (early fusion), and use some glycerine with the water to "thicken" the brushing consistency, and sometimes a touch of Elmer's Glue to keep it from smudging after it dries (if painting on top of glazes).  Propylene glycol also can be used to make it brush better (not ethylene... toxic).

 

best,

 

................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been experimenting with brushing on oxides. Sometimes I add a pinch of ball clay. It's ok. Better is using some slip I keep on hand all the time. Just a small amount then adjust for flow with water. I use to paint. I have acrylic medium on hand. It's like acrylic paint but dries clear. This works well esp. For fine line work. You add water to it to dilute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John, can you give some relative amounts of those ingredients? And also, does this mix dissolve into the glaze at all if applied underneath?

I've been working with a mix of oxides and epk, and it's got some promise, but this tends to bleed if used under a glaze, and runs like a tap if placed over glaze.

 

Edited: never mind. I realized today I should go off what's there already:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

albany works good for the RIO wash and dark pigments, but for other colors i'd suggest something like bentonite, kaolin or ball clay.  a little flux will help fuse it as well. i usually use gerstley borate or sometimes a frit (if there's enough clay content).  almost always use CMC gum solution to help suspend it and give it the "candy coating" once dry for anti-smudge properties.  i've never tried the glycerine additives, but suppose they would work well since they are thick.  karo syrup is another one i've seen people use.  epsom salts does work too.

 

Ratios:  usually an underglaze is 1/3 color (stain), 1/3 clay, 1/3 flux....for something like RIO/marking/signature solution i'd go with around 3 RIO, 2 clay, 1 flux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TJR, if you see this post I would like to look at your brush work. And thanks for the tip about adding the Albany slip. I am new here so I don't know how to reach you or view your gallery.

Click on his avatar, then once there click on gallery and you'll see some of his work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TJR, if you see this post I would like to look at your brush work. And thanks for the tip about adding the Albany slip. I am new here so I don't know how to reach you or view your gallery.

Click on my picture of the plate. Then on the left side you will see a list of options. Click on Gallery. If you don't get there, let me know.

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.