Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rebekah Krieger

Obsessed With This Glaze!

Recommended Posts

Ok I keep thinking of this glaze!!      http://www.pinterest.com/pin/111323422012924715/   can anyone assist me in finding a cone 6 version of this or tell me how I would convert it? I do not have components to mix glaze up yet, I have been ordering recipes  I get from Glazemixer.  It is the most stunning emerald green ever! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're looking at a very liquid glaze at temperature which is thicker at the bottom where most of the glaze runs, which is probably colored with an excess of copper oxide.  The excess amounts crystallize out.

 

A glaze like that can be as easy as mixing Ferro Frit 3269 with black Copper Oxide.

 

This is the color produced using only 4% Copper Oxide.

gallery_18533_643_110745.jpg

 

The glaze below is probably closer to 9% or more Copper Oxide. You can make the green darker with a pinch of cobalt oxide.

It may also contain a bit of a crystallization initiator like titanium dioxide or rutile.  But too much will turn it a pale green.

You eliminate the crackling above by adding something, like silica, to reduce the COE.

d24656b40f3df6ef4c12d6f9ca2731f3.jpg

Ok I keep thinking of this glaze!!      http://www.pinterest.com/pin/111323422012924715/   can anyone assist me in finding a cone 6 version of this or tell me how I would convert it? I do not have components to mix glaze up yet, I have been ordering recipes  I get from Glazemixer.  It is the most stunning emerald green ever! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no indication that this is a cone 10 glaze unless Rebby, you know this for a fact. This looks like a cone04  very shiny runny glaze. The colour effect can be achieved in oxidation with 2% copper carb and 2% red iron oxide.

I know this as I have a tile that looks like this. It is terra cotta clay, white slip, then the green glaze. Lots of people ask me for it, but I am firing stoneware.You are right Norm. Looks runny.

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with black copper oxide, with some TitaOx- rutile has too much iron that would change the color. The "crackle" effect is actually glaze/clay interface checking due to COE differentials. Looking at the raw edges on one pic shown: either porcelain of white stoneware. Reminds me very much of crystalline glaze formulation, less the seeding agent to produce crystals. Glaze application has to be higher- .40 -.50 grams per square inch. Ferro Frit 3110 -50%, SiO2 - 30%, ZNO- 20%, plus 7-8% black copper ox. Throw 3% lithium and you can cook it at cone 6-7.

 

Nerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Matt Oz notes above, Helena Andersson works in earthenware, not porcelain or stoneware.

 

Would not 7-8% of black copper oxide push the glaze into the non-foodsafe range for copper potential leaching? Is that a glaze recipe you've used on functional ware?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was estimating from the color range I saw in pics- certainly not for functional ware. The glaze color, crackling, opacity, remind me very much of a basic crystalline formula; less the seeding agents. Missed the note on earthenware. Good looking piece. I run a similar color range in tile; also the reason I estimated that range.

 

Edit Note: The whitish/light grey on the rim of the platter can also be caused by higher % of titanium. If it is a high ZNO recipe, TitaOx in the 4-7% range will show that color streaking.

Nerd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

How do I attach an image?

 

First, you might need to resize your image. The maximum files size for each post on this forum is 500kb. In Photoshop (or similar program) make sure your image is RGB, 72dpi, and we recommend under 600 pixels wide. Then go to File > Save for Web & Devices. You should see 4 versions of the image at differing levels of quality and file sizes. Choose the smallest file size possible without compromising your image quality. Then click Save.

 

After you have your image resized, go to the bottom of your post and click More Reply Options, then to Attach Files at the bottom of the page. Click Choose File button. Navigate to your photo on your computer. Choose the file and click the Attach This File button. You will see a small thumbnail of your image on the left and an Add to Post button on your right. Click the Add to Post button. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.