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justin1287

Stainless Steel In Kiln?

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One thing is for certain people want to use metal at high temps.

We  know it spalls -flakes and expandes and melts sooner or later.

Not all metals are equal in this but they all will not be happy

kanthal or nichrome rods made for this are your best options

I also know folks do not want to accept this-thats ok-I have always wanted to drive my car into space but its hard to get the velocity and friends say its not practical .

Since I was asked to expand the thoughts on this I will say forget about us telling you to not do it but try it and let us know whats happens.

We want you to succeed  but know of some failures -that about wraps it up for this 5 year thead on metal in kilns.

 

Edited by Mark C.

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I use a stainless steam table pan to sinter metal clay, at 1720F the pan spalls and leaves a mess to vacuum up each time. Once I ordered 12 ga 'kanthal' on Amazon from China, it looked funny but I used it anyways. The rods spalled and the beads were magnetic  :0

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17 hours ago, NancyAmores said:

I use a stainless steam table pan to sinter metal clay, at 1720F the pan spalls and leaves a mess to vacuum up each time. Once I ordered 12 ga 'kanthal' on Amazon from China, it looked funny but I used it anyways. The rods spalled and the beads were magnetic  :0

Wait are you saying atht at 1720F (low temps for sure) that stainless steel is breaking down and spalling and making a mess-thats not even low fire 1800 degrees yet. How about that. would would have guessed.??

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Depends on the kind, or "series"...

Google say stainless melts ~2550-2880F; 400 series at the higher end, which, btw, are magnetic. The working temps, naturally, are well below the melting temps...

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Stainless steels have good strength and good resistance to corrosion and oxidation at elevated temperatures. Stainless steels are used at temperatures up to 1700° F for 304 and 316 and up to 2000 F for the high temperature stainless grade 309(S) and up to 2100° F for 310(S).

THat was from a metals site  Cone 6 though is around 2250, so really SS is not going to work at that temp.  It is not going to melt (2750F melting point) but as others have said it will probably loose some of it's properties and it might even bend.  Most clay tools I have seen are not hardened in the first place so it's more the corrosion resistance you are likely to lose.

A pretty non reactive and high melting point metal is tungsten.  It is very brittle so you are not going to be able to bend it but you can get it in small rods as TIG welding electrodes.  It melts at 6150F (3400C) so WAY past where the kiln will go.  They come in different diameters .020" is the thinnest I know of.

For bead trees I have seen people also use Nichrome wire.  It has the advantage of being able to bend but it's melting point is only 2,550.  It won't melt at cone 6 (or even at cone 10) and is not going to corrode  as much as S Steel might.

 

BTW if you get TIG electrodes they come in a variety of aloys.  I would avoid the Thoriated tungsten (red tipped).  It's not much of an issue but they are slightly radioactive.  The only real danger is grinding and breathing the dust but why add risks you don't need to.

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