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kheicksen

Will this work?

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I am a new ceramic artist and have limited resources. I like to use my forms as canvas. I recently started working with Laguna Speckled Buff cone 5 stoneware and did some decoration that I would like to have white on but I have no white glaze or underglaze. I do, however, have a giant bucket of Laguna Cone 04 white clay slop/slip. I was thinking of painting a thin mixed version of this onto my stoneware for the white I need. Anyone ever done anything like this before? Will it melt all over the kiln (its not mine)? Is this a potentially dangerous experiment? I have worked really hard on this commissioned piece and have already applied the slip to the bisqued piece but am wondering if it was a dumb idea and if I should wash it off? Your experiences and thoughts are appreciated :-)

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I am a new ceramic artist and have limited resources. I like to use my forms as canvas. I recently started working with Laguna Speckled Buff cone 5 stoneware and did some decoration that I would like to have white on but I have no white glaze or underglaze. I do, however, have a giant bucket of Laguna Cone 04 white clay slop/slip. I was thinking of painting a thin mixed version of this onto my stoneware for the white I need. Anyone ever done anything like this before? Will it melt all over the kiln (its not mine)? Is this a potentially dangerous experiment? I have worked really hard on this commissioned piece and have already applied the slip to the bisqued piece but am wondering if it was a dumb idea and if I should wash it off? Your experiences and thoughts are appreciated :-)

 

 

That is a tough one. I believe it will form a glaze on the piece. However, not knowing the specs of the Laguna white clay you used have no idea if it will have some sort of problems like shivering, blistering, or bloating over the piece. Maybe others will have a better feel for what will happen. Good luck.

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To put a slip onto a bisque piece is not impossible but the slip needs to be formulated to be applied to bisque, not all the slips will stick to the pot once it is bisque and considering the difference in firing temperature (^5 and ^04) I think this is a recipe for disaster, I wouldn't do this in my kiln, much less in somebody else kiln.

Buy a small 6oz white glaze and use it properly.

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Buy a box of smooth, grog free, cone 5 white clay, let it dry out completely, and use it to make slip for decorating on your cone 5 stoneware.

 

Im assuming ......for application at leather hard stage or before?

 

I have some white slip made as per above, but getting inconsistent results 'cause clear,glaze, (community studio glaze) is eating it up, basically clear glaze dissolves white slip......???

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Yes, slip is clay and so must follow the rules of attaching clay to clay- nothing dryer than leather hard. If your white slip is disappearing, you need to put it on thicker. It's not the glaze's fault. The iron in the brown clay is coming through. 2-3 coats of white slip should do it.

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Thanks - I washed it off. I might experiment with this later with some protective measures taken. One would think that because the low fire clay melts at higher temps it might become glaze like... . .

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Thanks - I washed it off. I might experiment with this later with some protective measures taken. One would think that because the low fire clay melts at higher temps it might become glaze like... . .

 

Don't forget that the slip is still clay. If you apply it to a bisqued piece, that bisque has already gone through a lot of its firing cycle.

 

The slip hasn't had its molecular water released yet, hasn't had its organics burned off yet, and hasn't shrunk yet.

 

More likely than not it'll outgass (probably through any glazes over it) and most likely crack or shiver (depending on the different expansion coefficients).

 

It's possible, with specifically formulated slips, but it's pretty tricky. Especially if you're glazing over it.

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