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Brandee Ross

Searching For Red Cone 6 Oxidation Glaze

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I've had good results with Mastering Cone 6 Glazes' "Raspberry". Now I'd like to work toward more of a true red. Are there any good alternatives to Mason stains to achieve this? I can't find many red oxidation recipes for a starting point.

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Have you tried Randy's Red? Some hate it, soome use it sucessfully, it is a rusy red, but not at all Rasperry, which is very pinkish for me. If you wish, I can look up this and post it.

Sorry you had to 'hang' so long be4 someone responded. I've not been on for a while. Let me know if you would like the recepie. Glad to share.

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...a true red. ... I can't find many red oxidation recipes...

 

I suspect the short answer is there aren't any, but that's not entirely true depending on what you mean by "red". Since you brought up Mason Stains, which of their numbers do you consider to be the "true red" you're looking for?

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...a true red. ... I can't find many red oxidation recipes...

 

I suspect the short answer is there aren't any, but that's not entirely true depending on what you mean by "red". Since you brought up Mason Stains, which of their numbers do you consider to be the "true red" you're looking for?

 

 

I would tend to agree azjoe. Wished I had a dollar for every time I heard someone ask 'is there a really good, true red?' That true red seems to be an elusive color when in the presence of high temperatures. Another aspect to this is also what azjoe is hinting at, in what your consideration is of a true red.

 

I have actually heard three different people discussing whether a certain red color was the Christmas red of Santa's jacket. One thought so, the other's didn't. They each had there own idea of what THAT red was. Seems we all must have a certain perception of what that 'true red' is.... so much so that Coca-Cola even went to the expense of copywriting (patenting?) the red that they use on their products, (so I've heard).

 

And I recall, years ago at a Contemporary Ceramics Convention in Houston, that one of the Studio owners asked the Duncan Product rep during his talk, this same question. I smiled and laughed inside when he responded, that Duncan 'was working on it, now, and thought they would have one out by the end of that year (1998)'. Haven't seen it yet! But then, I'm not so optimistic... feeling that with the thousands of years of ceramic history and the millions of people working within the medium in that time, that if it was possible it would already be on the shelves.

 

Actually it is, it's called paint. And that true red paint doesn't need to go into the high temperature extremes which those reds seem to generally not be able to endure.

 

Just my 2¢....

 

----rick smile.gif

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Here's a C/6 oxidation recipe for a very nice berry like red. Slightly transparent it works best on white bodies. Because of it's translucency, it's fun to do some design work under this glaze with colored slips. Try it:

 

CHROME RED Glaze.

 

Gerstley Borate 21

Nephsy 16

E P Kaolin 11

Ca Co3 Calcium Carbonate 20

Silica 32

Tin Ox. 5

Chrome Oxide 0.15

 

Keep potting,

 

Stuart

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Brandon,

I posted a mug with the iron red on the bottom. If you open the jpg it looks more accurate when blown up. It is a really nice red. IMHO

It is under my profile I think but I made it public. I started an album for visuals for the forum topics. I have used up my allowed space for attachments to the replies.

Marcia

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Thank you all for the helpful replies. Marcia, I saw your mug and that color looks promising. Does it require special cooling? I do not currently slow cool my kiln; instead I let it cool on its own at a rate of ~200 degrees per hour for the first 3 hours and ~100-125 degrees per hour after that. This method is tolerated well by my other glazes.

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Thank you all for the helpful replies. Marcia, I saw your mug and that color looks promising. Does it require special cooling? I do not currently slow cool my kiln; instead I let it cool on its own at a rate of ~200 degrees per hour for the first 3 hours and ~100-125 degrees per hour after that. This method is tolerated well by my other glazes.

 

I hold it for 20 minutes and drop it to 1800 or so for 1 hour.

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Here is a site for iron red glazes to look over:

 

http://www.johnpost....pes-cone-6.html

 

 

 

I spent quite a long time looking at John Post's site last night. I found it very interesting and plan to test several of the glazes he generously offered. Also enjoyed seeing his studio and viewing his beautiful pots. Well worth viewing. SUS

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Here is a site for iron red glazes to look over:

 

http://www.johnpost....pes-cone-6.html

 

 

Thanks, John, for all the info and some nice-looking glazes. The metallic spangly variation of Pete's glaze is nice but Jean's Juicy Fruit is even better (but, of course, not a red). The variation on your jar reminds me of the beautiful Tuscan gold on Steven Hill's pots.

 

jim

jimsandefur.com

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Electric reds are great because they either go to a red or clear not LIVER like ^9r.

Studies have proven that men and women see the color red differently. I've verified it over the years w/ my students.

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Electric reds are great because they either go to a red or clear not LIVER like ^9r.

Studies have proven that men and women see the color red differently. I've verified it over the years w/ my students.

 

 

Yes there are glazes that I told students were "forgiving" glazes since they had tendencies to either turn to color or were either clear or a non obtrusive white. Most of the time these glazes were in the pink to red range due to the chromium as a coloring agent. Be forgiving I explained that if it was not correctly mixed, not applied thick or thin enough, or did not get the right temp in the kiln that it didn't turn out bad. Just without color.

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