Jump to content

Flesh tones, underglaze? Two questions


Recommended Posts

I'm sculpting in porcelain and having a hard time with Caucasian flesh tones using underglaze, especially gradations. I want some color on cheeks but can't seem to figure how to add it to the layer of basic flesh tone. If I try for a transparent watered down 'blush' it's of course very runny and blends poorly; if I mix a range of tones it also fails to blend nicely.  I've tried dabbing and sponging as well as blending with brush, smoothing with my finger... no good!

Also, if any of you are doing figures/heads, what underglaze colors do you mix for skin tones?  I'm usually looking for a quiet, pretty pale, even start.  And also for those delicate flush colors.  I'm a better sculptor than painter  sigh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good question!

Perhaps a few sessions of test tiles would help, and an airbrush (or atomizer powered by blowing) for adding layers of very small droplets?

Perhaps #2, forum members who have had some success with colour gradients/blending will share their experiences...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

are you painting two separate colors?   you can mix underglaze so you have only one color at a time to paint on the clay.  not limiting to only one color, you can have the original colors and the blended colors.   would that help?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, the flesh I'm making now is a 4 color blend (still not thrilled) and the color I want for those highlights is a just that with a bit of red and coral. Maybe mixing a lot of gradations in that handy ice cube tray would be the best way.

Shading delicately is tricky too, for the same reason - some people do that with an underglaze pencil.  Hmm - if those can be smudged with a finger that might work, on bisqued  underglaze.

I may have to just start going for a more expressionistic, heavily colored surface but...  :(.      Seems like if I could get slightly reddened water to apply right that would give me the subtle, transparent 'watercolor' effect I want.  I can get that on mugs and such using dried diluted underglaze cakes but blending onto a very pale under-layer evades me.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Hulk said:

Good question!

Perhaps a few sessions of test tiles would help, and an airbrush (or atomizer powered by blowing) for adding layers of very small droplets?

Perhaps #2, forum members who have had some success with colour gradients/blending will share their experiences...

And airbrush would probably be terrific for the stuff I'm trying to do - the blower I think would be too spattery.  Alas I don't have one and my budget isn't gonna let me acquire one in the near future. I could try smudging tiny dots while still damp but so far any effort at smudging or brush blending just picks up bits of color unevenly, if that makes any sense. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, laughlin said:

Hmm - if those can be smudged with a finger that might work, on bisqued  underglaze.

Amaco Underglaze chalk crayons do smudge really well. There is a blush rose colour, maybe that tempered with some of the light brown or white would work. They are fragile so maybe crushing a little bit of them to a powder then using a makeup blush brush to apply then work into the bisque would be worth trying.

1845004618_ScreenShot2021-10-08at11_56_10AM.png.640af3ff4c902042952ce6fc671417a7.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@laughlin,  where are you in maryland?  i am just across the potomac.   i have a Paache airbrush and compressor that i have not used since trying it out years ago when i bought it.  if you are close enough and want to try it, you may.   if it works for you and you would like to buy them both, i am sure we can work something out.   first, you have to try them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's really kind, oldlady! I live somewhat far away, near Perry Hall. I think that I can access the whole booth setup at the nearby CCBC and plan to check it out soon. That'd be best as my work space is miniscule.  I actually chipped some dried bits of UG from inside jar lids yesterday, dried 'em a bit more, crushed them to fine powder and applied with a very slightly moistened finger, pending purchase of chalks. I don't know if they'll adhere, or burn out being so thin, but we'll see!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.