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Best method for using stains as overglaze


tomhumf
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I'm wanting to use stains to paint with brushes over a base glaze. I want the colours to be as intense as possible. They would be used on food surfaces. I've tried just paining them straight on before but they don't melt. I just did a test mixing a stain with frit 3134 in varying amounts. The idea being I would get the most melt for least colour reduction.  I'm getting some bubbles where it's thickest on most of the samples though. I'm guessing this method is probably a bad idea? 

My base glaze isn't very clear so perhaps I'll try and work on a clear base that will work over my main glazes - otherwise any suggestions of the best mediums to add stains to for rich over glaze painting? It would be nice to have the option of adding more flux somehow to control how much the stains bleed out into the main white glaze underneath. You can see from this test they are all very controlled - would prefer a bit more melty look I think. I'm firing to ^8 reduction.

Also I'm not sure how easy the brush work is going to be with glaze on glaze - especially as im not very good as brushwork yet! 

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Edited by tomhumf
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Mayb more frit required. 

Bubbly bit , the coloured stuff too thick .i think you could dilute with water without losing the intensity.

I s.times use a little bentonite as well as the frit to keep everything suspended but still need to stir between brushfuls. A lot more watery than you imagine I think

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2 hours ago, tomhumf said:

otherwise any suggestions of the best mediums to add stains to for rich over glaze painting?

While not a stain solution, definitely something to consider is lowfire glaze brushed over your finished project. Stroke and coat glaze is popular for this use. The piece is finish fired, then decorated with Stroke and Coat and down fired to cone 04.

The mug bellow was  down fired  several times as the dragon was applied and took shape. Anyway not a stain solution but a way to apply reasonably durable color decoration to a finished item. The finish is a glossy hard glaze. Might give you ideas of your own.

 

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Edited by Bill Kielb
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Hmm Babs do you just use stains with frit and bentonite, no other ingredients? 

Bill, thanks for that but I only expect these pieces to be a small portion of my work so don't think a special firing at ^04 would be practical with my biggish kiln.

 

 

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On 10/3/2021 at 8:46 PM, tomhumf said:

Hmm Babs do you just use stains with frit and bentonite, no other ingredients? 

Bill, thanks for that but I only expect these pieces to be a small portion of my work so don't think a special firing at ^04 would be practical with my biggish kiln.

 

 

If I cant get it painterly yes, but use cmc, cooked , if clogging.

Sometimes I use a bit of the underlying glaze instead of  the frit. With a matt glaze you may not get the "melt" 

Test with your glaze 

A satin or shiny glaze.

Are your stains body or glaze stains.

I found some blues are not as melty..very scientific.

The stains are powerful.

I do the same with oxides.

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