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What kinds of glaze?????


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Hi Thuythanhthanh

My guess would be there are two layers, white sputtered on, blue-ish over? Or perhaps granuals/blobs mixed in the glaze that make the white spots ...or cuts/chattering in the clay were filled with the contrasting glaze, wiped back, allowed to dry, then dipped in the over glaze.

Good question

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Well, "T", the truth of the matter is you probably have zero chance of duplicating a glazing process that complex--I bet even our seasoned long-term professionals might have a tough time with figuring that one out and then duplicating it.  Good luck--hope you post more about what you're doing with your ceramics. 

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It can take years to formulate a glaze like this,  some potters will share the formula's,  others won't this is how they make money.    Even if you get the formula it would still be difficult to recreate.  Application methods, firing schedule, thickness of clay.  type of clay and how good of job you did when you made it.     Denice

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Can you take a much higher resolution picture of a few of the spots? The fine-detail might give somebody a clue about their development.

PS There seem to be a few low-density regions in the spotting, does that say anything about glaze/spot application (or movement)?

Edited by PeterH
added ps
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It looks like 2 glazes, the base glaze being a volatile white gassy one and the top glaze being stiffer. In James Chappell's The Potter's Complete Book of Clay and Glazes he refers to this type of glaze combination as "Boil Through". That term seems to have been replaced with "Oil Spot", even for cone 6.  It would take some testing but I think if you used cobalt in the top/covering glaze something like this recipe  could work. To me it looks like the base glaze is white in this recipe so it would take some testing, having a lot of whiting in the base might be enough to create the gassing off that is necessary for these types of glaze combinations, glaze thickness will really come into play. It would be easier to create the reverse colouration, a dark volatile base glaze (with iron and cobalt) and a white top/covering glaze. Another combination from Glazy here.

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