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Supporting curved slab plates in the kiln.


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Hello :)

I'm usually a wheelthrower, but I've been making some slab built large plates recently and I'm finding they're slumping dead flat in a Cone 6 firing. They have a gentle curve as I'm drying them in a sling.

They're made from a pretty tight mid-fire clay, which I'd prefer not to change because I've made lots of decorating slip for it, and it's lovely when it's fired.

I'm wondering if i should be firing them in another bowl covered in kiln wash? Any advice would be much appreciated!

Kendall

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I fire curved rectangle serving dishes with a small foot added-they like to slump so I put a bigger curve on them.

I think a bigger curve will help-also maybe a looser body will help-I have not done this myself but have that other clay body for other larger forms.

I'm working with Porcelain

Edited by Mark C.
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3 hours ago, KMKM said:

...and I'm finding they're slumping dead flat in a Cone 6 firing. They have a gentle curve as I'm drying them in a sling.

Just to clarify, you are trying to maintain the curve? If so then yes, firing them in a form will maintain the curve but they obviously can't be glazed on the outside when doing the midfire glaze firing. Other option is to do the bisque firing to midfire glaze firing temperatures then use brushing lowfire glaze and refire to lowfire without the bowl form. Glazing mature clay is a pain and doesn't always work well but the gums in brushing glaze help it work easier than using a dipping glaze.

Welcome to the forum.

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1 hour ago, Mark C. said:

I fire curved rectangle serving dishes with a small foot added-they like to slump so I put a bigger curve on them.

I think a bigger curve will help-also maybe a looser body will help-I have not done this myself but have that other clay body for other larger forms.

I did exactly what Mark described a few months ago.  With Porcelain.  No slumping.  

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Thank you all, I'll try the foot first and see how I go. I agree Min, I've found glazing mature work to be a total pain, I'd love to see how they do high bisque, low glaze firings in industry.

Thanks for the welcome :)

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