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QotW: What is your first and second most expensive equipment expense? 


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Hi folks, no new question in the pool so I will pose another. Based on my buying my first new kiln in over 30 years, anything over 4k is a big expense, especially for a retired teacher and hobby potter. So I will ask of you:

QotW: What is your first and second most expensive equipment expense? 

This is a pretty easy question for me, as #1 is the new kiln, the L&L e28m-3 , and #2 is my 30 year old Brent CXC potters wheel. Really in the end, considering the years of use. . . these have been really cheap, even though the original sticker shock is daunting!

 

best,

Pres

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My big Skutt was my most expensive purchase,  it was used but needed elements  and a new cord.  My Bailey slab roller with the added cost of building a table for it was second.   My new AIM test kiln and Brent wheel were about the same price as the slab roller.   Best buy for the money was the slab  roller,  I have used it more than any of the other equipment.   I have never had to fix it and it works like a new one,  I could sell it easily for the money I have in it.  I will probably keep it until I kick the bucket,  people will be walking past it at my estate sale wondering what in the heck it was used for.     Denice

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Pugger/mixer just edges out the kiln I bought new for most expensive pieces of equipment. 

I'm fortunate in that my husband has the skills (and welders etc) that we were able to build my slab roller and electric motor extruder. Years before we built the slab roller I put an add in the local buy & sell paper. Had to phone the add in, don't know if it was a typo or if there really is such a thing and I was misheard but the add came out as wanted: Flab Roller. 

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1 hour ago, Denice said:

  I will probably keep it until I kick the bucket,  people will be walking past it at my estate sale wondering what in the heck it was used for.     Denice

Fancy industrial nut cracker!

 

best,

Pres

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Ain' got me flab roller yet.
:|
Aaand, I still have some flab.
:)

Used, err, second hand wheel (it was still squeaky new), and very used kiln (it works gud) easily outdistance other equipment, although initial order - glaze materials, clay, some other clay supplier stuff - was more than the kiln, less than the wheel. Also spent some change on two semesters at the local JC Ceramic lab for Wheel I and Wheel II classes. The wheel, kiln, materials/supplies/tools and classes were all great investments.

Over the last sixteen years, the pounds have been dropping off, am down about ninety five or so, all without a flab roller, but the bike helps, and it rolls!

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I never considered welding my own slab roller.   My husband likes welding but isn't that good at it,  he decided he needed a better welder.   He bought new one a couple of years ago and hasn't used it yet.  I took welding in college,  my teacher said I was good at it but I didn't like it.   Maybe I should start using that new welder.    Denice

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When I retired from my day job, I had 3 choices for my "pay out" of accrued vacation/sick leave etc.:  save for the inevitable rainy day; go to Europe to visit art/culture centers like Italy/Germany/France (I've never never been north of Maine) or; make myself a studio.  My big treat for myself was buying new equipment-I am a wizard at saving money & have no problem with used/repurposed stuff, but this represented what I had put on the back burner for over 40 years, so brand new it was! Highest costs were my L&L 23s kiln, the Brent ie-X wheel, and my Bailey table top slab roller. Equally expensive was changing the big bedroom into a studio and the back porch into a kiln room, with proper electric, running water, floor covering, & lighting. Even tho I am not doing as much now & the body & brain are resisting a bit, it is still the best money I ever spent!

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Two one ton extended vans bought new  made by my order over past 20 years-Had one for 10 years put 180k on that one the other is also 10 years old now bought new for 35K and it has 70k on it now-slowing down on  miles now less than 4k a year on van

Then two Peter Puggers-both bought used one this year

Then Baliey electric slab roller bought new a few decades ago or more .

5-6 brent wheels over 48 year period -1st one in 1970 for 270$ new a model CXC in 82 both of those where new all the rest used except a model A off ebay-new old stock a few years ago as a spare trimming wheel

some where in this mix is lots of hardbrick/softbrick which cost more than a wheel for sure to build kilns

Edited by Mark C.
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  • Pres unpinned this topic
  • 3 weeks later...

Lots and lots  and lots of brick for kiln along with all other accessories required to use kiln, and second the pugmill.. oh and the Bugatti Veyron to go pick up supplies really really fast.

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7 hours ago, shawnhar said:

Bailey pro 50r wheel 

Bought one of those for the HS I worked at. Great wheel, solid, good motor and controller. For most potters it would do well, but for the HS with 50 min. periods and clean up at the end, better to have the other version with the removable splash pans. Next 3 were those.

 

best,

Pres

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14 hours ago, Pres said:

Bought one of those for the HS I worked at. Great wheel, solid, good motor and controller. For most potters it would do well, but for the HS with 50 min. periods and clean up at the end, better to have the other version with the removable splash pans. Next 3 were those.

 

best,

Pres

So true, that giant molded non-removable splash pan would suck in a class environment unless you connected a drain hose to the hole and literally hosed it out after class, they are a pain to clean when really messy. They do keep the mess pretty well contained though, which I really like. Anyway it was not what I would have chosen, the cost made the choice for me.

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On 6/14/2021 at 12:52 PM, Denice said:

  I will probably keep it until I kick the bucket,  people will be walking past it at my estate sale wondering what in the heck it was used for.    

As once said to my wife "hope you like the taste of nuts & bolts" as I dont even want to think about $'s spent in the shop. I guess we are adding Kilns and Clay to our retirement food menu.

Since everything is heavy (shear weights 15,000#s), i have decided to leave all that to my daughter to deal with. Being an auction & vintage equipment freak, i have tooling even i still dont know what it was used for...

 

shop.jpg

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