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Everytime I rebuild a kiln, I try too do upgrades that should make them last longer, run more efficient, safer, ect. I'm considering using an ITC coatings this time on the kiln body, and if it goes well, add it to my upgrade program. I've seen products for the brick itself, and coatings for the elements also. Do any of you have any idea how well these products work, and products that you like.

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Tell me more about what you plan on coating? Hard Brick? soft Brick? How hot are you firing to?

I have coated electric kilns-salt kilns ,reduction cone 10 kilns soft brick ,hard brick.kiln shelves. advancers,dry pressed high alumina shelves ,mullite shelves.

I need a bit more info. ITC has gone to the moon price wise .

I can address the pros and cons but need to know ,more on what your are thinking of coating and how hot you fire

Edited by Mark C.
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2 hours ago, Johnmicheal said:

Everytime I rebuild a kiln, I try too do upgrades that should make them last longer, run more efficient, safer, ect. I'm considering using an ITC coatings this time on the kiln body, and if it goes well, add it to my upgrade program. I've seen products for the brick itself, and coatings for the elements also. Do any of you have any idea how well these products work, and products that you like.

I am happy with ITC on brick in general - coated a couple gas kilns and I would say it was worth it.

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I have a couple 1027s, an olympic and a 1227 skutt kilns, the brick are good, usual wear. Was about to start going through them one at a time. Elements, converting to three zone, upgrade some control boxes. I thought while the elements were out, I'd consider spraying the body's with a refractory coating. I have heard of itc, but was wondering if there were any like products, or better products on the market. Even thought of coating my thermocouple to prolong it's life, especially now that I'll have three per kiln, yikes.

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It will add a bit of protection to electric kiln soft bricks. The one I sprayed I sold before much firing so its a toss up. I think 3 protection tubes are a better investment.

If you do use it on soft bricks a few things  to do first spray the soft brick with a mist of water first and only apply a very very thin coat so it does not get heavy and spall off the brick. This is best practice . If you fire constantly it may be worth it. It does add bit of strength to soft  brick surface-keep it thin and wet the bricks 1st.

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16 minutes ago, Johnmicheal said:

I've read that it also increases the efficiency of the kiln. I do fire alot, and the fact that my kilns are 20-30 years old and have been rebuilt a couple times, durability wouldn't hurt. Are there any competing products?

 

There are several competitors so searching for refractory coatings should get you some competition. ITC has been at it for quite some time and generally the improvement in refractory equates to faster ramp times by way of a more refractive inner surface. These coatings are used in industry, large furnaces / kilns, real serious stuff. I am sure there are other brands as well. In  my use of ITC I feel it did decrease the radiant losses of the kiln and even though I have the infrared means to quantify it, we did not at the time. Always regretted not testing that thoroughly.

Aremco pyro paint 634 al is a refractory improving coating, pyro paint 634 ZO is a coating for electrical elements.

 

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Edited by Bill Kielb
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9 minutes ago, Johnmicheal said:

I hadn't considered coating the elements. Could you create a reduction atmosphere in a kiln with coated elements?

Some of these coatings protect against that so likely yes. Industry does some pretty extraordinary things, including heating in a vacuum so I am sure you can find a coating that may help. The question likely would be what Is the transmission reduction or attenuation vs increase in longevity. Pretty specialized complicated stuff considering replacing a handful of elements is relatively cheap for pottery kilns.

Edited by Bill Kielb
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ITC also made an element coating in fact I think regular ITC is ok on elements-but I would not bet on it as my memory is a bit fuzzy on that.They did make a special element coating for sure at ITC.Back in the day I bought  amny many gallons of that stuff.

The whole deal went sideways for me when Fritz sold it after his wife passed away. The price tripled and the product variety went away

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Ive used itc 100 and i see absolutely  no difference between it and the plainsman kiln wash formula. Both are basically zircon. I can make lots of the plainsman for a fraction of the cost of itc. My 2cents...

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1 hour ago, Russ said:

no difference between it and the plainsman kiln wash formula. Both are basically zircon. I can make lots of the plainsman for a fraction of the cost of itc. My 2cents...

Have you tested this in some way with respect to radiation? I would be curious to know the reduction in radiation losses you achieved with zirconium

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Thats way too much scientific like for this hillbilly! Sorry Bill... The only way one could possibly tell would be two identical kilns fired side by side and i would assume the time factor would tell the differences.  i started using it  because Fritz told me it would keep the ash from sticking to the walls. Well.... that didnt work.

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2 hours ago, Russ said:

s.  i started using it  because Fritz told me it would keep the ash from sticking to the walls. Well.... that didnt work.

Yeah, it’s sorta made for a different purpose than kilnwash. Industry seems to get a benefit from it, just wasn’t sure if zirc  kilnwash provided some benefit. I have an IR camera, just never checked it. Sort of regret than now

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I used it inside my brand new hardbrick kiln so I really dont know if there is a substantial amount of savings in time versus a non sprayed kiln. I assume its negligible as ive fired other  untreated wood kilns and they fire about the same except for the forced air kilns which are way faster.  I have been using the zircon based kilnwash HOPING it will speed up the process and last firing I THINK it it seemed to help... a bit, but with a hand fed man powered kiln there are so many factors that it would be impossible to tell.  So  I guess I could sum this up by saying "It makes me FEEL better that Ive coated the interior with zircon." :D

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