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Repairing bottom of pot after glaze fire


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After I bisque fired this pot the bottom splintered off a bit.  I reattached some larger pieces with clear glaze before the glaze fire and they worked out fine BUT I still have these gaps.  Plus I really slacked on trimming :huh: 

Photo  / Photo

Suggestions to fill gaps and tidy it up a bit?  It’s a white stoneware clay. 
 
I did find some pieces and can slot in; Photo

many thanks! 

 

Edited by Meredith London
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Hi Meredith!

Cool texture, colour.

You might polish that foot off so it doesn't scratch surfaces, then move on t' next pot?

I've been using a diamond grit polishing disc (which I've glued to a bat) to smooth off feet (probably got the idea here) - a splash of water keeps it cool and controls dust, a few seconds straight on, then rotating at increasing angle to round off the edge a bit, voila, done.

1499083602_polishedfoot.JPG.ce47d6542cd27d59e1167aabddf88522.JPG

 

 

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One of the reasons that most of us will be inclined to tell you to discard it and start again is that most adhesives will fail over time, causing the pot to weep if you were to put flowers in it that need water. If you just want to put pencils in it or similar, a 2 part epoxy, or something like a cyanoacrylate glue (Crazy Glue) will work for the purpose. Don’t use brands that expand when drying, like Gorilla Glue. Be advised that it will forever and always be a bit fragile. Selling it or giving it away is inadvisable, in the event it fails.

So then, if you do indeed make more pots (and everyone here knows how addictive and awesome it is!), you tend to wind up with a lot of your own work, because making errors constantly and a lot is part of it.  Eventually you have to start making choices about which pieces to keep, and which to toss. While I have a few of my first pots because it can be helpful on the bad days to see how far you’ve come, no one keeps all of them. You wind up being less and less precious about them, because there are so many, and your work does get better with practice. If you’ve got your heart set on keeping it, just be aware the shine might come off it later. Don’t be afraid to take a hammer to the ones you don’t totally love.

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that pot was thrown and it looks as though it was left for a long time with a very thick bottom.   we all did that in the beginning.   thick bottoms will spall and look like shale that splits because of the weather.   google spalling in geology for photos.

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I dont think it looks thrown, wonder if it was.

My thick bottoms  ha! Usually crack.

Almost looks like a bottom onto which a slab was added, no scoring,  which then shattered. On firing..moisture trap.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/28/2021 at 12:45 PM, Sorcery said:

In regards to figuring why it happened....

Many more info? Fire schedule blah blah...

That looks like an odd happening.

Sorce

 

I am wondering if it happened because either or possibly both - the bottom wasnt entirely dry, I fired a bit too hot - instead of a cone 06 for bisque, I did cone 6....

 

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On 2/27/2021 at 5:19 PM, Hulk said:

Hi Meredith!

Cool texture, colour.

You might polish that foot off so it doesn't scratch surfaces, then move on t' next pot?

I've been using a diamond grit polishing disc (which I've glued to a bat) to smooth off feet (probably got the idea here) - a splash of water keeps it cool and controls dust, a few seconds straight on, then rotating at increasing angle to round off the edge a bit, voila, done.

1499083602_polishedfoot.JPG.ce47d6542cd27d59e1167aabddf88522.JPG

 

 

Thanks...you do that with the polishing disc after bisque and/or glaze fire?  I'll have to get one of those...I think I have been neglecting my bottoms!

 

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Hi again Meredith!

I'm running the foot on the wet diamond disc after glaze fire to give it a smooth polish.
If/when it ever wears out, I'll go with a larger one - the six inch does the job ok though.
A rough foot can be smoothed with sandpaper, perhaps not as fast and easy; aluminum oxide seems to work fine, work wet, else outside and breathe upwind.

Trimming to a tidy foot makes for less work to polish, and burnishing the tidy foot (when still damp - try using the metal rib while still chucked up for trimming) gets it very close to scratch free.

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+1 for cleaning them up while they’re still green, and being careful to dry them on a clean, smooth, crumb free surface. I would far rather give a foot ring a bit of a polish with a silicone rib while it’s still leather hard than spend any amount of time with a grinder. Prevention is far less work than remediation.

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8 minutes ago, Hulk said:

Hi again Meredith!

I'm running the foot on the wet diamond disc after glaze fire to give it a smooth polish.
If/when it ever wears out, I'll go with a larger one - the six inch does the job ok though.
A rough foot can be smoothed with sandpaper, perhaps not as fast and easy; aluminum oxide seems to work fine, work wet, else outside and breathe upwind.

Trimming to a tidy foot makes for less work to polish, and burnishing the tidy foot (when still damp - try using the metal rib while still chucked up for trimming) gets it very close to scratch free.

thanks - i am always very attentive to the bottom of my pots that I throw - but this was a large hand built pot i made over the course of many sessions, i just totally neglected it!  Lesson learned!

 

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6 minutes ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

+1 for cleaning them up while they’re still green, and being careful to dry them on a clean, smooth, crumb free surface. I would far rather give a foot ring a bit of a polish with a silicone rib while it’s still leather hard than spend any amount of time with a grinder. Prevention is far less work than remediation.

yes, absolutely - i just totally forgot to sort out the bottom, I hand built it and normally throw - when I throw I have a proper trim session but with this guy I just sort of blanked on the bottom trim and totally forgot...it was too thick, possibly a bit wet

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