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An interesting topic has come up (for me) in the liner glaze thread.  Basically when a glazing or any other procedure is more practical for a production potter or a studio potter or a beginning or casual potter.  A production potters goals are much different from either a studio potter or casual potter.  I'm using the term studio potter to define myself.  Lots of experience, but no interest in making lots of the same pot.  A casual potter simply hasn't made enough pots at all.  For this particular operation, a liner glaze in a mug or bowl with a sharp demarcation to the exterior glaze, the casual potter wants a relatively fool proof method that will give the best chance of success for a good percentage to come out as expected.  No special skills required.  Neither myself or casual potter is going to gear up for a 100 pot run.  If there's a step in the procedure that guards against error, such as getting exterior glaze inside on the liner, it's worth it to both of us to wax the inside first.

I assume the majority of persons who lurk on this forum are not production potters.  I thought to write my steps for their benefit, as it took me quite a while to figure it out myself.

It's definitely worthwhile to hear from the pros, I appreciate their input even if I can't always use it.

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I try and give tips that would be useful for the OP, whoever it is in a given thread. And you’re right. I’d like to encourage anyone who might be lurking and not speaking up because they’re worried they don’t have enough skill to chime in anyways. There’s lots of ways to do just about anything with clay, and having a variety of solutions is helpful.

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There exist many different variations of skill here, and at the same time experience differs immensely. 

I once took a job to create 2K small cup like pots for a conference. I am not a production potter, but took the job as a problem to solve in my benefit. It took learning to throw well off the hump with a different form of opening up and throwing. I have not done such since as I am not that guy that can sit at the wheel and throw hundreds of the same pot. 

Many here have taken one or two classes in college or at high school and want to do more. They don't speak up, same as when they were in class, as it is safer to sit in the background and not be noticed whether in the classroom or on the forum. There are those of us here that are akin to Marcia Selsor creating museum and gallery work. Others like I just want to create nice pots that feel good, look good and work well.   Still others struggle just to get the clay centered, or the edges joined, or a pleasing form.

So where do you target your thoughts, too low and there is not a whole lot of growth, too high or technical and people just gloss through it because they really don't understand what you are talking about. Best bet is to take the middle road. . . introduce the big topic, explain it in the simpler terms and list some other posts that get deeper into the nitty gritty of the problem. Don't make people twist their tongue and drift to sleep because you have gotten too deep.

 

best,

Pres

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@akilspots, I wonder if the better question is how many pots before you become a potter.  To me casual is a matter of choice, especially if you have a job that provides all that you need. Then again, as a retired teacher, part time production potter, and now casual potter now it is a matter of need. It is the need of any other addict; you just can't walk away especially if the feel of the clay in your fingers precedes the feeling of pride from a fine well thrown, aesthetically pleasing, well glazed piece of pottery.

 

 

best,

Pres

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To me, the difference between a casual potter and a studio potter is the studio.  A casual potter may not have a complete investment.  I know a few potters that outsource their firings.  A casual potter can be quite complete with just a bag of clay and some off the shelf glazes or even just one iron wash.   It's a fine hobby with almost no investment at that point.  A studio potter most likely reinvests his sales in facilities and equipment for quite a long time and so has a large degree of versatility.  At that point, is freedom to make whatever comes to mind.  Creativity is the push.  Not to say that casual potters and production potters aren't creative also.

A production potter has the investment, but requires a return on the investment.  Both material and time.

I've always thought ceramics was particularly wonderful because there are so many ways to go about it.  The process is the reward.

 

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I transported work to be fired for years. I still work out of an 11’x11’ basement bedroom and get water from the bathroom sink across the hall. It’s the largest, most complete studio I’ve ever had in 20 years.  Just because I have a workroom with useful things in it doesn’t mean I always did, or that I’ve forgotten what it was like. Or that I would expect everyone to have all the things.

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