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Hello! Hope you all are doing great! I'm a new potter only 3yrs experience(self taught), and I've always wondered..  is there a technical reason why we need foot on our plates?..  does it prevent warping or something like that?

thanks!

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Hi Titi!

Plus:

  limit unglazed portion to just the ring - the rest of the underside glazed, hence stronger, easier to clean, etc.

  limit contact surface - easier to make flat (so the pot doesn't rock) and easier to make smooth (so the pot doesn't scratch surfaces)

  provides a place for fingers to catch - easier to handle

  allows for precise thickness - better balance, lighter, closer match to the rest of the pot, etc.

  looks cool

  cut away the least conditioned part of the pot, the layer against the wheel head (or bat) is most likely to start cracking (per above)

  increase durability - ring provides mass and structure at the base, where impacts are likely

Minus:

  takes time to cut foot rings

  takes more time to glaze

  generates trimmings

Other:

  plates are a special case, bein' flat an' all...

Other other:

  We've had a week of rain and wind here!

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If you don't put a foot on them you can get what I call spinners.  The middle of the plate end up being lower than the edges.  This is also a problem of drying but a foot ring gets rid of the  problem altogether.  Lin

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oh, lin, spinners sound like frisbees so they must make a wonderful sight flying toward the shard pile!!   much better than meeting mr. hammer like mine sometimes do.   if they have'nt met the cherry tree trunk as greenware first.:lol:

Edited by oldlady
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46 minutes ago, LinR said:

If you don't put a foot on them you can get what I call spinners.  The middle of the plate end up being lower than the edges.  This is also a problem of drying but a foot ring gets rid of the  problem altogether.  Lin

Yep! that has happened! haha I thought the reason could be that the plate was a bit thin... and do you recommend a minimum size of how much tall the ring should be?

Thanks!

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22 minutes ago, oldlady said:

oh, lin, spinners sound like frisbees so they must make a wonderful sight flying toward the shard pile!!   much better than meeting mr. hammer like mine sometimes do.   if they have'nt met the cherry tree trunk as greenware first.:lol:

haha you just trash them?

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1 hour ago, Hulk said:

Hi Titi!

Plus:

  limit unglazed portion to just the ring - the rest of the underside glazed, hence stronger, easier to clean, etc.

  limit contact surface - easier to make flat (so the pot doesn't rock) and easier to make smooth (so the pot doesn't scratch surfaces)

  provides a place for fingers to catch - easier to handle

  allows for precise thickness - better balance, lighter, closer match to the rest of the pot, etc.

  looks cool

  cut away the least conditioned part of the pot, the layer against the wheel head (or bat) is most likely to start cracking (per above)

  increase durability - ring provides mass and structure at the base, where impacts are likely

Minus:

  takes time to cut foot rings

  takes more time to glaze

  generates trimmings

Other:

  plates are a special case, bein' flat an' all...

Other other:

  We've had a week of rain and wind here!

very useful, more pros...

THANKS! 

Other:

too special.. Sometimes I just want to give up making plates :/ 

Other other:

here only lots of rain!

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yes, unless i want a bird water dish to go on a stand with a hollow in the center, the birds don't care.   i have a huge platter out on the porch with sunflower seeds in it.   one of my neighbors said my pink, decorative spiral it looked like pepto bismo vomit on the black platter so i just gave it to the birds.

Edited by oldlady
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All of the above answers are correct. Having said that, I make my plates without foot rings, because I want to produce them as fast as possible. It can be done. I've never made a spinner, but do occasionally produce rockers, which get sold as seconds.

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31 minutes ago, GEP said:

All of the above answers are correct. Having said that, I make my plates without foot rings, because I want to produce them as fast as possible. It can be done. I've never made a spinner, but do occasionally produce rockers, which get sold as seconds.

Yeah, me too to make them fast, how thick do you make them?

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33 minutes ago, Titi said:

Yeah, me too to make them fast, how thick do you make them?

About 1/4 inch thick (6mm) for dinner and salad plates. For larger things, I'll go a little thicker. Keeping them flat is mostly about technique, handling them without too much stress, allowing them to dry evenly,  and firing them on a kiln shelf that is free of any lumps or warping. 

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19 hours ago, GEP said:

About 1/4 inch thick (6mm) for dinner and salad plates. For larger things, I'll go a little thicker. Keeping them flat is mostly about technique, handling them without too much stress, allowing them to dry evenly,  and firing them on a kiln shelf that is free of any lumps or warping. 

and you dry them on drying racks or plaster?

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2 hours ago, Titi said:

and you dry them on drying racks or plaster?

I dry them on commercially-made ceramic field tiles, because they are so reliably flat. I should note that my plates are made from slabs, not wheel-thrown, therefore even thickness throughout. Drying them evenly is not that hard. When I make wheel-thrown plates and platters, I dry them upside down, because there is usually extra thickness in the floor which will dry faster if facing up. 

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