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Liner glaze


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I'm guessing the production potters here don't use liner glazes.  The reason for my thinking is that I don't know a way to make a clean transition between the inside glaze and the outside glaze that isn't just very time consuming.  I'm doing it with latex resist, 1st glaze, wax resist, then second glaze.  It looks good and I don't do kitchen ware very often, so not really a big deal for me.

I guess the other option would be an overlap on the outside that worked between the 2 glazes.  Not going to happen with a shino or a lot of glazes.

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An idea I've had for years but never actually got around to making is a glaze pan for doing rims of mugs etc. Glaze the outside like Liam said then to get an even line around the rim dip in a pan with a threaded shaft through the middle to let the air escape. Marker line around the inside of the pan (black line) to keep the glaze level topped up, hole drilled through the pan (red circle) and threaded shaft (blue) with a washer and nut on each side to keep it snug, probably need a little gasket to stop leaks. Would have to sit it on a container of some sort since the thread goes out the underside. Think this would prevent glaze burps inside mugs etc and make an even glaze line.

1289792569_glazepan.png.d63180b33d6595fd27dd477306076b93.png

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I totally use liner glazes. 

I’ve found it’s important to decide exactly where you want which glaze to end and the other begin, and pay attention to how you make your rims in order to make that happen more easily. For instance, I like showing off a little of the red clay in each piece, so I throw my serving bowls (see current profile pic) with a flat beefy rim that I polish, but leave as bare clay. Because of the rounded square edge, it’s easy to make that line of demarcation nice and neat with a little wax and a quick wipe. With mugs, bare clay rims make me shudder to think about. So I bevel my mug rims inwards, so that there’s an obvious place for the outer glaze to end and the inner one to begin. I do that roll and pour thing to get the inside of the mugs, and then depending on the model, I’ll either hold the mug upside down and pour glaze over it, using a brush to smooth out the inner rim, or I’ll dip carefully again while holding the mug upside down. I’ll admit that last one can create minor splashes.

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12 hours ago, Min said:

An idea I've had for years but never actually got around to making is a glaze pan for doing rims of mugs etc. Glaze the outside like Liam said then to get an even line around the rim dip in a pan with a threaded shaft through the middle to let the air escape. Marker line around the inside of the pan (black line) to keep the glaze level topped up, hole drilled through the pan (red circle) and threaded shaft (blue) with a washer and nut on each side to keep it snug, probably need a little gasket to stop leaks. Would have to sit it on a container of some sort since the thread goes out the underside. Think this would prevent glaze burps inside mugs etc and make an even glaze line.

1289792569_glazepan.png.d63180b33d6595fd27dd477306076b93.png

Why not make the above out of clay? Throw a shallow bowl with a hollow riser in the middle and trim a foot ring in the bottom with a notch or two or three (like a berry bowl). Open the hollow shaft to the bottom and scribe a glaze level line on the inside...

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40 minutes ago, JohnnyK said:

Why not make the above out of clay? Throw a shallow bowl with a hollow riser in the middle and trim a foot ring in the bottom with a notch or two or three (like a berry bowl). Open the hollow shaft to the bottom and scribe a glaze level line on the inside...

Yup, that would work too! Maybe a little faster to make using a cake pan, doesn't need to be glazed and fired. But my version would need to sit on something.

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I use liner glazes nearly every week.

I'm a production potter

We use a glaze jet on most all interiors (you can look up this homemade tool) It sprays a glaze straight up.  It fits into any 5 gallon bucket. Its a production tool. I did a how to in studio potter long ago on how to make this tool. On about 1/3 of wares like glasses and 1/2 glazes and certain mug extrior colors I use white interior glaze. on the rest its a rutile blue-booth clean very well and are tough glazes. They play well with  all my glazes as well. Since you have the pot inverted upside down the lip edge is a clean perfect glaze job and if its not a large wet sponge laying on counter makes it so with a Quik twist on the lip.

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however you do your interior, spraying is very easy on the outside.  a kiln load takes me a few hours from hot waxing to loading.   i am getting much slower as i get older but it is still the best way i know to avoid smudges, drips and overlapping.  the exterior does not drip over the edge and the line is always straight.  

i would probably make mugs if i had that wonderful bucket glaze jet that mark has.   i saw it advertised way back when but could not afford it.

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Edited by oldlady
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Easiest fastest way I have found to do a liner is do the inside, wipe the excess, then just dip the whole thing in another color. Done. I only use 3 glazes and all of them work doing this. Yes, it changes the liner a bit but so what I say. You can get a perfect transition from outside to inside every time. 

I hate that darn burp when dipping the rim!

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13 minutes ago, Mark C. said:

You can make that glaze jet yourself for about $30 if you are handy-you need to thread some stainless rod (dies)and cut and glue PVC and boldt or rivet rubber.

its on page 55 here in the 2008 issue

https://studiopotter.org/digital-issue/116

I made one with an aquarium pump and a foot pedal too, just haven't used it in a while and I can't remember why

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8 hours ago, Hulk said:

Functional ware is liner glazed by definition (imo).

2 disagreements with this statement. 

First, the reference to "functional ware".  Kitchenware or food ware would be more accurate as (for instance) my planters are as functional as your bowls and mugs. 

Second,  (imo) when potters use the term "liner glazed", they're assuming a different glaze on the outside that is not intended to contact food.  If you glazed the entire piece with a standard food safe glaze, you wouldn't refer to it as a liner glaze.  The intent of the exercise is to use a wider range of glazes than would be allowable with a single application approach.

The first one actually bugs me since potters making planters seem to be held in lower esteem (imo).

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7 hours ago, Mark C. said:

I use liner glazes nearly every week.

I'm a production potter

We use a glaze jet on most all interiors (you can look up this homemade tool) It sprays a glaze straight up.  It fits into any 5 gallon bucket. Its a production tool. I did a how to in studio potter long ago on how to make this tool. On about 1/3 of wares like glasses and 1/2 glazes and certain mug extrior colors I use white interior glaze. on the rest its a rutile blue-booth clean very well and are tough glazes. They play well with  all my glazes as well. Since you have the pot inverted upside down the lip edge is a clean perfect glaze job and if its not a large wet sponge laying on counter makes it so with a Quik twist on the lip.

But does that get you a dead sharp line between the glazes?  Or does the "play well" part mean the overlap looks ok?

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14 minutes ago, CactusPots said:

2 disagreements with this statement. 

First, the reference to "functional ware".  Kitchenware or food ware would be more accurate as (for instance) my planters are as functional as your bowls and mugs. 

Second,  (imo) when potters use the term "liner glazed", they're assuming a different glaze on the outside that is not intended to contact food.  If you glazed the entire piece with a standard food safe glaze, you wouldn't refer to it as a liner glaze.  The intent of the exercise is to use a wider range of glazes than would be allowable with a single application approach.

The first one actually bugs me since potters making planters seem to be held in lower esteem (imo).

Functional Pottery is a specific subset of pottery with a focus on regular use.  A flower pot would not be considered functional pottery, even though it serves a function and is pottery.  More a gripe with semantics.

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ok! Esteem I hold for others' work has less to do with intended use than ...many other things.

That said, soon, I'll be inna my fourth year of potting; looking back on the arc o' my progress, I anticipate another load of planters . Ware that have a nick, pit, crack, craze, crater, bloat, and/or don' look right (to me) get a hole drilled in them; I mix up some o' the sand with Kellogg's, wander about the yard gathering succulent cuttings, assemble, then tend'm for a several weeks until well rooted. From there, a few sell, some are given away, and the rest donated to a few outfits 'round heah. I'd rather not throw them away.

Said planters have plants in them, as well as lil' bugs and whatnot - live things, hence, liner glaze be appropriate - my opinion. Down the line, someone may grow sprouts, or herbs in'm. From there, as folk may choose to drink from a vase, utensil organizer, etc., I liner glaze just about everything. All my glazes are food safe, however, I choose to liner glaze - it's my choice. I'm not interested in non-food safe glaze for any surface of functional ware.

I'll stick with this: Functional ware is liner glazed by definition.

Edited by Hulk
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Liner glaze to me should simply mean a durable safe glaze, known to be durable to keep the piece being lined very water resistant and for wares involving food:  durable, will not dissolve, and contain oxides reasonably safe for human consumption if ever so slight amounts of the glaze dissolve.

The problem is food safe in the US simply means no lead or cadmium. If one gets a good dose of silica with every drink or bite I guess it’s ok. Food safe should have greater definition, but then again liner glaze probably should and just what is a durable glaze to folks and how do they know?

so throw in functional ware to many already poorly defined terms, more confusion = greater clarity!

Im with hulk, no questionable oxides for me, safety first. What I do know for sure is very few folks asserting safety, durability etc... do this anecdotally and don’t really have tested results.

Asbestos was safe and a miracle ........... right up until it wasn’t.

 

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Edited by Bill Kielb
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4 hours ago, CactusPots said:

But does that get you a dead sharp line between the glazes?

If the 2 glazes are similar in composition there is going to be less chance of them flowing together and creating an uneven line during the melt. If you want a dead sharp line then avoid having one glaze high in alumina and the other low in it (for example), what the one glaze is low of it will pull from the other glaze. If you use a gloss over a matte or vice versa there is often more visual texture happening between the two glazes than having the same (or very similar) bases (plus colourants or opacifiers) overlapping. Same principle for keeping a sharp line between glazes. Other thing is to make gravity work in your favour, do the change between inside and outside glaze at the highest point on the rim so any flowing that happens when they melt doesn't mingle with the other glaze.

Edited by Min
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On 1/12/2021 at 4:22 PM, CactusPots said:

But does that get you a dead sharp line between the glazes?  Or does the "play well" part mean the overlap looks ok?

Play well to me means no glaze issues as they do not crawl or bubble or flaw. Dead sharp lines is not my style of work presently. Thats not to say I have not done that type of work just not now (47 years you end up doing all types of work). My work now is much looser glaze wise . I do sharp lines with some glazes but they are really different like black and iron red-sharp line and favor that look.I'm loose with glazes its my style.I love to glaze and its one of my favorite thgings to do-for me pots are just a canvas to some degree.

Liner glaze to me means a in sisde glaze thats good for cleaning amd is flawless for use like food. When I made planter some had liner glazes as well for easy repoting .

As to your comment on planters being in lower esteem all I can say is make them and then you will see a well made one that drains well and works is in itelft a tought job. Sure at 1st you nmade them all with hole in center and stack the heck out of unglazed insides so you can fit a bunch but throw a few 20-24 inchers with built in drip trays that drain to the sides  in 3 holes and have glazed bottoms with trimmed feet. I did all that in a former life but then I was just a potter making planters now I'm just a potter making funtional wares for the kitchen-same deal really

I find pots for the whole home appeals to a larger crowd as well sales wise.

Edited by Mark C.
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