Jump to content

Started my glaze firing with top for switches on (accidentally) EEEEK!!!!!!!


Recommended Posts

So, I have an old Evenheat 5320lt.....Apparently after last firing, I never turned the switches to OFF. Not aware of this, I started up my glaze firing with top four switches all on (lid propped, peeps open for what was supposed to be my 2 hour soak) thinking that I was turning the bottom switch on (which I actually turned off). Came out 15 minutes later and it was at 435 *  EEEEK! Not knowing what to do....I shut it down ...let it cool to 285 for about an hour ---my best guess (??) was to stop cooling while it was somewhere above 212*.....I then started it back up (bottom switch only) left lid and peeps cracked...but, it was still cooling.    I   decided to close the lid and plug the peeps and turned the downdraft vent on once i saw the temp consistently creep up (about 5 min). Most pots were bisqued years before, stored in a dry place....and the glazed also had about week to dry...so probably not a ton of moisture---but, then again....I dunno.   Not much i can do now...but cross my fingers...but concerned that pieces may have cracked, that my elements might have been damaged, and if they survive that my glazes will be messed up .....if anyone has any input to give me a heads up on what I MIGHT expect.....I would appreciate it. I cannot believe I did this! grrr! I am so bummed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@muddkat, I would not have worried about it, just put the lid down and set my firing to regular time considering it was starting at 435F. I also wonder why you are doing a candling on a glaze load that has had plenty of time to dry. I usually only vent or candle on a glaze that I have waxed bottoms or on one where the glaze has been applied in the same day. You  should be fine, just do your firing as normal.

 

best,

Pres

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I used the term....candling incorrectly (that's for bisque).....should have said the slow warming period (?) to allow any moisture to escape (i am sure there is a proper name for this...ramping?).  I  very much appreciate your reply----stress level has lowered! :) but, still crossing my fingers!  I have been into pottery for about 5 years....but, only about 6 glaze firings under my belt....this is a learning moment! "CHECK SWITCHES!" lol...with a little urrugh.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it is....lol! .....been one of those days....my cat snapped a string on one of my ukeleles....so, while waiting to flip switches on the kiln, I  learned how to restring and to put ukes WHERE MY CATS CAN't GET TO THEM!  Much learning going on.......  Tomorrow, hopefully there will be  pretty pots to welcome into the world! :) 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

one other thing you might check if you have a kiln sitter with a timer.   make sure the timer has enough time on it when you start a firing.   i was not familiar with a timer and twice the kiln stopped firing for "no reason".   when opening the kiln,  i now have a moment before lifting the lid to put all the switches and the timer back so they are ready for the next time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oldlady.....yes! That timer! Its the first thing I turn on before firing up.....

Sorcery.... Good thing your little rodent friend didn't climb up your pant leg! eeek! lol

This was the most uneven firing I have ever done. My last firing was decent---but, variance in firing temps per witness cones   5.5-a bit over 6 on various shelves. 

Top shelf over fired (witness cones show ^ 6.5+, ---color burnt out of slips and underglazes)

Forgot to put kiln packs on center shelves when I rearranged things while loading---most pieces were okay but some appeared to be e a bit over fired while others, it appears glaze did not fully mature in inside and outside-could be that I applied glaze to heavy but, I tried to pay attention to even coats--do think it pooled too heavy in bottom of mugs---used Sahara lead free on those pieces.

Bottom shelf only hit ^ 5...with ^ 6 withness cone barely bending.

So...not sure if was my SWITCH mishap, shelf spacing, or if my elements are dying---just checked them...they all fire up but dark spots on the straight shots---warming faster at bends--maybe that is nomal...they arenot saggy. I am reading about testing resistance (?) ----or could it be something dying in my kiln sitter? Replaced tube assembly about 2 years ago---3 firings since.  Looking at new kilns....which all are out of my price range.  Happy with some pieces...but, a bit flustered. 

Sorry....off my orig topic. I should prob  direct questions about uneven firing and elements in another post . I am just perplexed and a bit flustered as try to figure this out. I am  just venting. :/ Thanx for your replies and humor!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If your elements have dark spots, that’s a strong indication your elements are dying, along with the fact that it’s firing that unevenly. Elements can be shot, and still be in place and upright. Testing your resistance is a quick and easy way to confirm that, yes. If you don’t own a proper meter, make sure you get one that can be used on a stove. There are ones that don’t read up to that level of voltage, and they’re cheaper, so you might be tempted. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.