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Hand-built Sculpture Disaster


LeeAnets
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On 12/28/2020 at 3:23 AM, LeeAnets said:

 

The slabs were wrapped in plastic and attached probably within 2 hours of making them. I worked on the main piece (walls and base) then added the main attachments next. I seriously doubt they were leather hard by that time, being wrapped tightly in plastic.

 

 

Maybe my scoring is so visible because I am too aggressive with scoring?? 

 

To gentle on attaching.

Scoring should disappear on joining pieces together.

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I've had this problem a lot, as it's just part of my work.  I think what's happening is that the outside clay layers dry and trap moisture in the slip layer.  A good solid connection is the first part as everyone notes.  An extended time in plastic bags equalizes the moisture between the layers.  A slow dry to basic dry and and then  extended dry to get the internal moisture.   Easy for me in the summer time, not so much now. 

 The bisque cycle should be slow to 200 with a soak before moving on.  Even if the bisque is perfect the attachment can peel up on the edge sometimes.  I think it's just  part of the process to have some failures.  My stuff has gotten much better in this regard with time and practice.

This problem is the number one contributor to my shard pile.

Also, I never liked Rod's Bod.  Much prefer Soldate or S 60

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Sorry to disagree with you @Babs, but it is my opinion that you are mixing apples and oranges. It is true that air pockets in the wall of a pot do not cause the pot to blow up, but that it is moisture in the pot that turns to steam. However, when it comes to two layers of clay joined together expanding air with not escape route can put pressure on a layered join causing the two pieces to separate.

 

best,

Pres

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1 hour ago, Pres said:

Sorry to disagree with you @Babs, but it is my opinion that you are mixing apples and oranges. It is true that air pockets in the wall of a pot do not cause the pot to blow up, but that it is moisture in the pot that turns to steam. However, when it comes to two layers of clay joined together expanding air with not escape route can put pressure on a layered join causing the two pieces to separate.

 

best,

Pres

My logic is opinion only too Pres. My logic goes with the escape route for the air still exists and with careful drying, and acceptable rate of firing "should" allow air to escape through the usual pathways.

But if the process is sorted as  so many have written about,  should go ok.

Dont know how you'd test for this one.....

 

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small suggestion.   if you have rolled out the slab of clay to make your form, add the pieces to the slab while it is still flat on the table surface.  folding the slab around your internal form maker will allow the whole thing to be a more consistent construction.   much easier to add pieces when it is flat than working on a standing cube.

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On 12/29/2020 at 3:49 PM, Babs said:

with the escape route for the air still exists and with careful drying, and acceptable rate of firing "should" allow air to escape through the usual pathways.

Yes, the air can still escape, but it has already caused the piece to not attach properly. Then with just the edges attached, normal shrink makes it pop.

Sorce

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