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Removing Glaze drip


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I am new to this board and have tried to search for answers to my problem. I have been very careful in brushing on glaze so that it is not overly think. I have one favorite glaze that just loves to drip. Since I use stilts, bubbles of drips tend to gather along the sides of the bottom, so that the ceramic piece does not stand straight. I would like to minimize the occurrence of drips and find a way to remove drips when they do occur. This is a commercial AMOCO "F series" glaze and I have tried to thin out the glaze but it still flows wildly. I fire at either cone .05 or .06 with the same result.

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I suggest brushing it thinner as you near the bottom of piece.

The only ways I know to stop runny glaze

Thin the glaze or application especially near foot

leave more unglazed area at foot for runs to run to

glaze lower half with stiffer glaze so runny glaze runs into that glaze

Make a ridge at foot to catch runny glaze

fire cooler or put this glaze in cooler kiln area

re formulate glaze

 

Now as far as getting rid of runs use a bench grinder or dremel tool to grind off the runs-use safety glasses and go slow.

Mark

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I suggest brushing it thinner as you near the bottom of piece.

The only ways I know to stop runny glaze

Thin the glaze or application especially near foot

leave more unglazed area at foot for runs to run to

glaze lower half with stiffer glaze so runny glaze runs into that glaze

Make a ridge at foot to catch runny glaze

fire cooler or put this glaze in cooler kiln area

re formulate glaze

 

Now as far as getting rid of runs use a bench grinder or dremel tool to grind off the runs-use safety glasses and go slow.

Mark

 

 

I have always used a "drip catch edge" at the bottom of the pot about 1/4" from the bottom. this slight edge at the top of the foot causes the glaze to slow, or in my case as I don't glaze bottoms, to stop. Easy to do in the trimming stage of thrown pieces, much harder in hand built. Sometimes when I know that I have a certain runny glaze in mind, I will add a series of incised lines about 3/8" apart 1/8" wide that will slow the glaze. This multiple break line slows the glaze and provides neat pooling areas that can decorate the bottom well.

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I am new to this board and have tried to search for answers to my problem. I have been very careful in brushing on glaze so that it is not overly think. I have one favorite glaze that just loves to drip. Since I use stilts, bubbles of drips tend to gather along the sides of the bottom, so that the ceramic piece does not stand straight. I would like to minimize the occurrence of drips and find a way to remove drips when they do occur. This is a commercial AMOCO "F series" glaze and I have tried to thin out the glaze but it still flows wildly. I fire at either cone .05 or .06 with the same result.

 

 

Often when I use a dremel to remove a bit of glaze, or a little imperfection, I follow with a rubber buffer on the dremel, and then a hard felt pad with tooth paste. In the end, it becomes very difficult to find the repaired spot.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am new to this board and have tried to search for answers to my problem. I have been very careful in brushing on glaze so that it is not overly think. I have one favorite glaze that just loves to drip. Since I use stilts, bubbles of drips tend to gather along the sides of the bottom, so that the ceramic piece does not stand straight. I would like to minimize the occurrence of drips and find a way to remove drips when they do occur. This is a commercial AMOCO "F series" glaze and I have tried to thin out the glaze but it still flows wildly. I fire at either cone .05 or .06 with the same result.

 

 

Often when I use a dremel to remove a bit of glaze, or a little imperfection, I follow with a rubber buffer on the dremel, and then a hard felt pad with tooth paste. In the end, it becomes very difficult to find the repaired spot.

 

 

Pres,

I'm curious, what bit on the dremel do you like? And which brand of toothpaste do you find works well?

-Lily

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  • 4 years later...

Just saw this Lily, Toothpaste, don't worry about brand, but look for one that claims to be a polisher. Most do. As far as Drill bits for rough work I use the pinkish bits in a variety of shapes. For the finer smoother work green or blue. I like the ones with the rubber like material, to work on smoothing a glaze imperfection in a pot. Usually don't have to do this much.

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