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Most glazes will settle out somehow if left for a month. It’s just a function of minerals that are ultimately heavier than water settling out of suspension. Hard panning is a result of some minerals being heavier than others, and various ionic charges working on certain particle shapes to really suction themselves to each other.
You don’t want to deflocculate a glaze that hard pans, you want to flocculate it so it stays suspended when it’s mixed. It will still settle, it just won’t get all rock hard. 

If the glaze has 10% kaolin or more, you can make a saturated epsom salt solution and add a teaspoon or two at a time to a 5 gallon bucket. Be sure to stir thoroughly for a few minutes before adding more. You can overdo it quickly.  If you’ve added too much, you may find the glaze takes too long to dry after dipping, or you might gel it if it gets way too far. 
 

If the glaze has less than 10% clay, it may need to have 2% bentonite added so that the Epsom salts will work to keep it suspended.

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I also have a newer glaze that is MSD-60 Walnut Spice. I bought it dry, like I always do and noticed that is was settling fast after the first mixing and glazing. I had a partial pint of (clear liquid that helps glaze not crawl) I cannot remember the name at the moment. So, I added some and feel like I may have introduced bacteria because now it settled to a nearly hard consistency. Will Epsom salts work for this issue too?

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Clay suspends very well. Almost everything else in a glaze wants to settle hard. So if there's enough clay (typically kaolin), everything will stick to it and it'll stay suspended. At least 10% clay is needed for that to work. For glazes that have less clay, we usually add 2% bentonite to the glaze. Bentonite is like super clay when it comes to staying suspended. 2% will help a lot but it's not enough to have an effect on the recipe. To further help, we flocculate the glaze with Epsom salts, which makes the particles stick together better so the clay can keep everything suspended. You can eyeball the Epsom salts, but generally no more than 1/2 of 1% by dry weight is necessary. Mix it with water and add/stir until you see the glaze start to thicken a bit.

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Big yep on Floetrol, and Emulsa Bond (also by Flood) - used many gallons of both (in the 80s). The prior conditions water borne coatings to flow better, dry a bit slower, lay down (smooth) better, and spray much better; the latter improves adherence of water borne coatings.  T1-11 siding, which was popular then, splits and peels - we used solid/opaque stain with the EB added, which really helps to keep the wood fibers together (better to use a "real" siding product, imo). 

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On 12/1/2020 at 9:12 PM, Hulk said:

T1-11 siding, which was popular then, splits and peels

Ahh yes, very popular in 70’s and 80’s.rough sawn very popular also. OSB worse than plywood. Prestain / seal all edges, z bar the top keep that water out. paint / stain every 3 years lasts a long time. If it touches the ground anywhere, forget it. The good old days.

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