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12 minutes ago, Mark C. said:

I always weigh my glaze and get it how I like it than and an suspesion agent-always done it that way

Never done it the other w ay around.

How does it work?? any change?

Agree Mark. Only use 3 glazes per se: but if you can learn to suspend crystalline- the rest is a cake walk. I use a cylinder because of easy calculation: 1 ml of water = 1 gram. The glaze is measured on a scale in grams= so calculation of SG just becomes a ratio. I make my own suspender. 

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4 hours ago, Mark C. said:

I always weigh my glaze and get it how I like it

I really favor glazes that perform well enough under a preferred sg. If I  need to adjust its viscosity from there I tend to get tired of a glaze that needs the extra attention. For dipping, I am lazy and don’t have any favorites that are that demanding.

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I only have 3 glazes out of 15 that need to be measured and only one that is critical . That one is my rutile blue which I use the most and have made for me by the ton dry mixed. Since it can run like crazy and wipe out an entire load I always tune it up and recheck it now and again.

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I've tweaked each of my "keeper" glazes sg and most o'm thixotropy as well. Per Rick's (second) question, the thixotropy may change a bit after sitting, and, allow newly  mixed glaze to slake a while, else anticipate re-adjustment after some days.

Just on account o' curious what distinguishes rheology, viscosity, thixotropy (from Wikipedia, Google, and Epoxy Technology):

  Rheology is not a measure of viscosity but an area of physics focused on the study of a substance's change in flow characteristics under applied stress or force.

  Thixotropic Index is a ratio of a material’s viscosity at two different speeds, generally different by a factor of ten. This value is indicative of a material’s ability to hold its shape. A highly thixotropic material will drop in viscosity as agitation or shear stress is increased. Mayonnaise is a great example of this. It will hold its shape very well, but when a shear stress is applied the material will easily spread.

  Thixotropy is a time-dependent shear thinning property. Certain gels or fluids that are thick or viscous under static conditions will flow over time when shaken, agitated, shear-stressed, or otherwise stressed. They then take a fixed time to return to a more viscous state.

  The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its resistance to deformation at a given rate. For liquids, it corresponds to the informal concept of "thickness": for example, syrup has a higher viscosity than water.

I do like words, somewhat! My intent is is mostly sharing (what I just learned), not so much lecturing, 'k?

What a difference adjusting glazes for dipping can make, aye, that's the point (for me) - where the glaze stays mixed better, is more forgiving (slow) in terms of film thickness per unit time immersed, is less prone to pin holes and crawlin', and is much less prone to sheeting and dripping.

Edited by Hulk
just now
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'xactly what Tom just said: "What a difference adjusting glazes for dipping can make, aye, that's the point (for me) - where the glaze stays mixed better, is more forgiving (slow) in terms of film thickness per unit time immersed, is less prone to pin holes and crawlin', and is much less prone to sheeting and dripping." We can talk the talk of pottery science, but unless we pottery walk the walk of pottery science, things just don't work as well. And when folks have misinformation or missing information about how things work, it usually doesn't get better, but rather gets worse. Establish the correct SG first, then adjust flocculation or deflocculation.

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