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QotW: Do you draw a line in the sand about technology when it comes to your studio or anything Ceramic?


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I don't think 3D printing is faster when it comes to making a mug @Chilly, but it may be tireless when producing 100 or 1000 mugs. Imagining 20 machines cranking out mugs all day. . . tires me out. I think there will always be a call for well crafted hand made ceramic either functional or non functional/decorative or sculptural. Just as there will always be call for well designed aesthetically pleasing massed produced functional or non functional/decorative or sculptural pieces. Then there will be the those that will produce mass produced pieces of now aesthetic value at all as in a widget is a widget and aesthetics is not necessarily functional.

best,

Pres

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I'm of the opinion that just because I may not be inclined to use a piece of tech in my own practice, that doesn't make it an invalid approach. I've seen some really interesting things done with a 3D

Interesting how the discussion quickly centered on 3D printing! I like what Tom noted about how much technology we use in the first place, and have ever since we figured out how to light a fire. I had

I've searched for examples of 3-D  printed ceramics online.    Many were  delicate, aesthetically pleasing  extruded coil pieces arranged in every configuration the computer and printer will allow, an

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15 hours ago, liambesaw said:

If you designed something, that does not mean you crafted it.  You don't call an architect a builder.  You don't call a fashion designer a seamstress.  Of course they can be both, but being one doesn't make you the other.  When you fully print a pot, it is outsourcing the labor to a machine.  Just like a building developer would outsource design to an architect and the building to a carpenter. 

Thanks for clarifying your position Liam. It seems we have 2 distinct conversations going on here, first one (topic Pres posted) is "Do you draw a line in the sand about technology when it comes to your studio or anything Ceramic?" Second conversation seems to be around the aesthetics of 3D ceramics and if it's a valid form of work for a potter or ceramicist to completely 3D print a pot / sculpture.

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1 minute ago, Min said:

Thanks for clarifying your position Liam. It seems we have 2 distinct conversations going on here, first one (topic Pres posted) is "Do you draw a line in the sand about technology when it comes to your studio or anything Ceramic?" Second conversation seems to be around the aesthetics of 3D ceramics and if it's a valid form of work for a potter or ceramicist to completely 3D print a pot / sculpture.

I think 3D printers are the only real new technology to hit pottery since I was born, so maybe this is more a question for the older people here then?

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I guess we old guys have seen a lot of tech happen over the years, but then again maybe the correct word would be innovation for some. I look at the marvels of the kiln controllers of today remembering why my kiln was purchased without a setter. Major change in innovation, and technology. I also understand the reluctance of 3D printing but realize that many of us are using computer controlled cutters to make stencils and decorating forms. All the way you look at it.

 

Glad to have found a topic that generates some traffic!:D

 

 

best,

Pres

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The big innovations since I started in clay are good electric wheels (ones that have power and variable speed control)-this was a. GAME CHANGER in the early 70s

Electric wheels in the 60s where horiable comepared to whats out there now.They where mostly AC with bad speed control.

The switch to Dc motors was a major improvement-I credit Robert Breent for this at that time. Soon they all followed.

Computerized kilns -both in gas and electric. Now its more of control and time saving-Zone control really is sweet for those who need it.-(not me)

You can argue griffen grips as they sped me up about 30% -50% in trimming-another game changer for us production potters

Kiln shelves which is really a major deal with the this strong non warping shelves-like advancers -huge game changer for me as I have piles of all the earlier shelves from mulite to sicone carbide to dry poressed English ones. They all where thick -heavy-and warped over time at cone 11. now its lite and flat and take up 1/3 the space-maybe the most game changer in terms of more wares in the kiln.

Now many of these really are not needed in hobby market but all are beneficial to us all.

The last mention iare vacuum combo mixer /puggers. Really another game changer fro production potters-time and ease of working with clay that you make to fit your needs.

I will think of more later after this expresso sinks in -back to the shop now as its xmas crazy production now

full speed ahead dam the torpedoes

 

On those older wheels that where not very good-The names I recall  as I thre on them all when learning where- 

Skutt-had a string out the side witgh a piece of wood for the foot pedal-poor speed control but buildt in spolash pan as oart of unit

Amaco -looks like a Buck Roger space wheel-super gear box but speed control was poor.

Oscar Paul--white enamel metal reminded  me of a bicycle-poor speed control

Edited by Mark C.
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On 11/21/2020 at 1:33 PM, liambesaw said:

I think 3D printers are the only real new technology to hit pottery since I was born

I guess you never noticed that there are computer controllers attached to kilns nowadays. :)

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3-D printed stamps from Spectrum Glaze

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Automated fire control likely predates Liamb's arrival (electromechanical logic, or relay logic goes back to about my Pa's grade school days), however, low cost cute lil' logic boards makes it available to hobby potters, much later ...thanks to development o' transistors, then integrated circuits.

The topic (thanks Pres!) sure generated some thinkin' for me - what is technology? bein' one o' the questions for sure.

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2 hours ago, Smokey2 said:

I have a feeling I'm quite a bit older than you. When new technology becomes common place it turns into an appliance that's hardly noticed.

When I was a kid we didn't have computers!

Hey, I do appreciate dc motor wheels after using a lockerbie and rk-2s until 2 years ago.  But it's still just an improvement on established 5000 year old technology.  The same for kiln controllers, giffin grip, etc.  

I've been trying to think of how 3D printing is analogous to any established pottery tool and I come up blank.   I suppose there's a comparison maybe between jollying/jiggering, but to the extreme?  

It is the inverse of CNC milling, which has been around for my entire life, I suppose if we used a milling machine to trim our pots I'd probably have the same feelings towards it.  I use both a milling machine and a 3d printer in my day job, works great for what we use them for!

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I actually saw yesterday a new type of 3d printing, it's 3d printing a silica based thermoplastic with a minimum tolerance of less than 1mm, once fired it's more like .1mm, so may see some super delicate stuff coming soon.  I think it's more for printing industrial components but I'm sure once it's more affordable or commonplace, hobbyists will get their hands on some as well.  

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