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Test batches - what do you do with them?


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I've accumulated close to 30 100g test batches. What does everyone do with leftovers? Pour all in one bucket to create a "mystery glaze", never to be reproduced again? :o 
Another idea is to try layering those that I think may create interesting combos.  But I strongly resent the idea of pouring them out...

What do you do with your tiny test batches?

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I keep as many of the test batches as I can. Of course the one that contains the final recipe is kept and added to the full bucket. Any other batches that were from the final line blend, say if two of them combined equal the final recipe, will be kept too. But everything else gets tossed (in the trash, not the sink). To me it’s not worth having a bucket of glaze that cannot be repeated. A bucket of glaze takes up a lot of space! 

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Some test batches I'll incorporate into the next test; be sure to double check the maths!

Some tests I've retained.

Have been retaining all waste; got around to sieving, and adjusting (specific gravity and thixotropy) said waste a few months ago, came out light blue/gray, muted gloss, which crazes on the clays that require low coe, but is good on the others - over a gallon of "free" glaze! Washing out the graduated cylinder, pails, buckets, washing off tools and oops glaze attempts, wiping up spills, wiping off from filling chatter marks ...it all adds up; given enough time, it settles, then I'm pouring off the clear liquid and retaining the sludge.

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I toss mine too. 

If you really want to save wasting materials and have a lot of waste glaze you could always do what Deb Schwartkopf does and mix waste glaze with scrap clay slurry and make paver tiles out it. Schwartkopf uses cone 6 glaze and clay and fires the pavers to cone 1. pdf below on how she does it.

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/537b8bf9e4b0452328986d22/t/5b19b2650e2e727770f49083/1528410726624/Waste_Schwartkopf.pdf

edit: I think a good coat of kiln wash on waster slabs under the tiles would be a good idea if anyone tries this. (it would be nice to see results if anyone does try!)

Edited by Min
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11 hours ago, Min said:

cone 6 glaze and clay and fires the pavers to cone 1.

She notes that these pavers  weather just fine---I thought firing cone 6 to cone 1 would render the item too immature to hold up over time in the cold  & wet weather. I decided to use cone 5 clay for my plant makers for that reason (NH winters)  but this implies I could use a low fire body (cone 4, specifically). Yes???

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8 minutes ago, LeeU said:

She notes that these pavers  weather just fine---I thought firing cone 6 to cone 1 would render the item too immature to hold up over time in the cold  & wet weather. I decided to use cone 5 clay for my plant makers for that reason (NH winters)  but this implies I could use a low fire body (cone 4, specifically). Yes???

The glaze mixed with the clay is heavy in flux, so the actual vitrification temp is probably much lower.  Not the same as firing a cone 6 clay to cone 4.  

Deborah schwartzkopf also lives here in seattle where things don't really freeze very often.  I've had terra cotta planters outside for several seasons without them splitting, but as soon as we get a nice deep freeze (maybe once in 4-5 years) they pop or shed layers.  Up to you, but if it freezes often in your area you probably want something with very low absorption

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On 11/2/2020 at 5:45 AM, Sorcery said:

I would catch all the crumbs from opening jars and pour out leftovers into a container.

This is what resulted.

It was very nice! And stable!

Test test!

Sorce

 

Wow, that's a really good result! The adventurous me would definitely mix up all the leftovers.

I was taught to be very frugal when it comes to glaze chemicals, so I collect all the crumbs too! And have separate small buckets for washing glaze tools and brushes. One day I'll have enough "sediment" on the bottom of them to actually glaze something. :) 

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On 11/2/2020 at 7:22 AM, Hulk said:

Some test batches I'll incorporate into the next test; be sure to double check the maths!

Some tests I've retained.

Have been retaining all waste; got around to sieving, and adjusting (specific gravity and thixotropy) said waste a few months ago, came out light blue/gray, muted gloss, which crazes on the clays that require low coe, but is good on the others - over a gallon of "free" glaze! Washing out the graduated cylinder, pails, buckets, washing off tools and oops glaze attempts, wiping up spills, wiping off from filling chatter marks ...it all adds up; given enough time, it settles, then I'm pouring off the clear liquid and retaining the sludge.

Yes, that! 

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there is another way to use your tiny scraps of dry  DRY glaze.  treat them like confetti and scatter all the colors together on a white background.   flat plate, white base glaze and confetti colors around a cut shape can be interesting.   kindergarten, yes.  fun, yes.

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