Jump to content

Lnl kiln not heating up


Recommended Posts

Hey everyone I hoping for some help troubleshooting an issue with my LNL da Vinci 3227 kiln it Is an older model kiln.  I recently replaced elements created all new connections with power cords kiln fired great for both bisque and cone 5 firing.  This week I went to fire and the top and bottom sections only went to 200° the middle section stayed around 100 I thought it could be thermal couples they looked spent so I replace them with all new connections.  Turned on again today and same thing after an hour it’s not had a error code but is not following program.  Just stalls around 200.  I pressed 8 to watch kiln cycle on controls.  top and bottom light turn on and off as cycling and middle light stays on kiln has a slight hum but doesn’t seem to heat.  I am thinking it could be a poor connection from the control panel to the Kiln but not really sure hoping someone might have some experience or advice to help me better diagnose my problem.  
thank you 

jPeel

Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely need electrical troubleshooting. How comfortable are you with checking relays and basic power path?  I would check all the connections and look for one or more that are marginal. Posting decent pictures of any connections will get you an informed opinion here. I read your comment about the indicator lights but do you hear the relays engage when the corresponding  light turns on?

Link to post
Share on other sites

@JohnP The indicator lights just tell you that the controller is sending a signal to that section. It doesn't mean that section is actually doing anything. The fact that the middle section light is staying on and not cycling confirms that the section is not getting hot. If you've got a multi-meter, you can unplug the jumper cords and see if there's power at the jumper outlet on the control box. From there you can test the electricity flow within the box to see where it stops. Don't do it if you're not comfortable and knowledgeable about working with live electricity. Alternatively, you can do a simple firing test to give you a good idea of what's not working. You'll need to unload the kiln, then set up a Vary-Fire program with one segment at a rate of 9999 to 1000 degrees. Start the program and it will turn the elements on full blast. Let it run a few minutes, then carefully crack the lid and see if the elements are glowing. Chances are you're going to see that the top and bottom rings are working, but the entire middle ring is dead. If that's the case, then you've either got:

1. A fried connection where the jumper cord connects to the elements. Unplug the kiln, open the little box on the kiln and inspect the element connections.

2. A dead relay. DaVinci models typically have two relays per section- a small one and a big one. The controller switches the small one which then switches the big one. Unplug the kiln, open up the main control panel and inspect. The difference between the two relays is pretty obvious. The small ones are little black rectangles with smaller wires, usually on the left side of the control box. The big ones are about 3-4" square and have large wires, usually on the right side just before the outlets for the jumper cords. Locations may vary depending on when the kiln was built. Usually it's the large relays that fry. The small ones don't carry any big loads so they last forever. Usually when the big ones fry it's pretty obvious and you'll see blackened or melted terminals. If this is the case, and you've got a lot of firings on the kiln, I'd replace all 3 big relays as they tend to have about the same lifespan.

Let us know what you find.

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, JohnP said:

Went back with Multimeter and discovered the fuses were not allowing current past. Luckily I had some on hand and have replaced them seems to be firing great so far.  Thanks again for y'alls help.

Fuses don’t really wear out, they fail because of a short circuit. Hopefully you found what caused them to blow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do occasionally run into fuses that have blown for no apparent reason, but it's certainly not the norm. Keep an eye on the large relays in case they're running hot. If you've got a laser thermometer, check them during the firing to see if one is running hotter than the others. In my Davinci, I've had a couple of fuse holders totally melt down when the relay failed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.