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Glazed tile stuck on kiln floor


JennyM
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If it's on the floor, not a shelf, then you want to try to get it off without taking too much brick with it. Try working/hammering a spackling knife under it to cut it loose from the bricks, assuming it doesn't pry up easily. The danger of prying hard is that you'll take a bunch of brick with it. If it's on a shelf, then a hammer and chisel, followed by grinding.

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Any chance the bottom had a coating of kiln wash?  This is generally recommended, in case something like this happens.

If there is wash on the bottom, then the tile should come off *relatively* easy.  If there is no wash, you are going to take some chunks out of the kiln brick on the bottom. 

I would take a think flat bladed tool, like a putty knife, and slowly work it under the edge of the tile, angling the tip of the blade upward, so as to remove as little of the brick as possible. 

Once you get it off, remove any leftover bits of glaze from the brick, as it will continue to eat through the brick, with every firing.

 

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If it's a top-loading kiln, it might be a good idea to disassemble the kiln and put the base on a sturdy table or workbench to work on it. 

That will make it easier to see what you're doing, and get a good angle of attack, without having to reach down into the kiln and possibly injure your back - or damage the sides of the kiln by leaning on it.

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Lots of unknowns in the original post.

I guess the base assumption is that the poster has an electric kiln unless stated otherwise.  We also have to guess there isn't a shelf on the bottom of the kiln to protect the soft brick.  Also no information about the type of clay used for the tile.  If terra cota, not so bad.  If porcelain,  

Bummer.

I'm with the Rockhopper, this is a disassemble.  The glaze will eat into the soft brick like soap into a sponge.  The tile being much harder than the soft brick will make it difficult to remove without destroying the brick.  My advice would be try the grinder, but be ready to go to a diamond head on a dremel.  Once you get it basically flat, set a shelf on the bottom as the new base.

Just how did you manage to get a tile flipped upside down on the bottom of the kiln?

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7 hours ago, CactusPots said:

set a shelf on the bottom as the new base.

@CactusPots Would you put the shelf directly on the kiln floor ?  I've always had a shelf in the bottom of my kiln, but on 1/2-inch posts rather than directly on the floor.  (Don't remember the details of why - just that "someone" said I should do it that way.)

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57 minutes ago, Rockhopper said:

@CactusPots Would you put the shelf directly on the kiln floor ?  I've always had a shelf in the bottom of my kiln, but on 1/2-inch posts rather than directly on the floor.  (Don't remember the details of why - just that "someone" said I should do it that way.)

Putting the shelf up on 1/2" posts serves two purposes- it allows the downdraft vent to pull air through the holes in the floor, and it provides an air gap that helps reduce heat loss through the floor.

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Thank you all for your thoughtful responses. I can't answer all the particulars as it is my friend's kiln. I had a few pieces along with his.  I need to find out if there is kiln wash on the bottom, a shelf   etc. I know the tile is not porcelain and only 2 by 4 inches. We are both fairly new at this so I don't know if he knows how to disassemble a kiln. I'll get some more info and be back!!

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17 hours ago, Rockhopper said:

@CactusPots Would you put the shelf directly on the kiln floor ?  I've always had a shelf in the bottom of my kiln, but on 1/2-inch posts rather than directly on the floor.  (Don't remember the details of why - just that "someone" said I should do it that way.)

In my electric kiln the shelf is on a layer of ceramic fiber.   The fiber extends all the way under the side walls, making a nice tight gasket.   My gas kiln the bottom shelves are on 1/2" posts.  The electric kiln is only fired to 06.  Seems to work fine.

I was just pointing out that the work should not be directly on the soft brick, in case that isn't obvious to all.

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