Jump to content

Recommended Posts

When I first learned about terra sig I just fell in love with the look it produces on greenware.  But then realized that the look disappears upon firing (Cone 6 stoneware).  Is there a way to keep that satiny, shiny lustrous look but still fire it high enough to have functional ware?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Rick Wise said:

en I first learned about terra sig I just fell in love with the look it produces on greenware.  But then realized that the look disappears upon firing (Cone 6 stoneware).  Is there a way to keep that satiny, shiny lustrous look but still fire it high enough to have functional ware?

my experience of TS on cone 10 R stoneware:
the fired surfaces feel and appearance depends on multiple variables:
   the clay (including clay bodies) used to make the terra sig, 
   the clay body substrate,
   the thickness of the slip applied,
   the thickness of the application, 
   the compression of the TS into the substrate,
   the burnishing of the applied TS, 
   the contrast between the fired colors and textures of clay used to make the TS and the clay body substrate, 
   the coarseness of the TS particles (the longer you allow the clay to settle the smaller the particles in the final TS),
  and a few more my memory can't recall ...

Try mixing small amounts of the raw clays and other stuff (coarse fire clay, sand, fines from crushed bisque ware) with the TS; use thick TS slip; 

iet  (Ignore the "rules", Experiment, Test) 

LT
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

After doing some research I see on other posts in this forum talk of liquid quartz. Have you looked into that? 

From their website:

what is it?

A food safe, permeating sealer designed for use on unglazed ceramic ware, rendering it waterproof, stain resistant, & yet completely unchanged in appearance.

Made from SiO2 (or Silicon Dioxide/Silica), a naturally occurring oxide & one of the most abundant minerals found in the Earth’s crust, most commonly in the form of Quartz. It is used extensively in the production of glass, glazes, underglazes, clay body stains as well as terracotta, earthenware, stoneware & porcelain clays. It is highly abrasion resistant (7 on the Mohs scale) & thermal shock absorbing.

Liquid Quartz is certified food safe to the stringent EU food safety standards (read more in the Instructional PDF found below) & is completely skin neutral. It is essentially self-cleaning, being hydrophobic & oleophobic; resisting staining from oil, grease, acids, alkalis & alcohol as effectively as any matt glaze, reducing the need for chemical cleaners & harsh detergents. Water will simply bead off, taking surface contaminants with it. (Note that just like a matt glaze, prolonged contact with some foods may still mark the sealed surface. To avoid this, plates should be rinsed clean as soon as possible, as with all your ceramic ware.) It cures completely within 24 hours without firing or further treatment, & is completely invisible once dry. It is dishwasher & microwave oven safe to 450°C (& also stable to -70°C, making it popular for outdoor sculptural work in extreme conditions). It is also antibacterial & will help prevent the formation of algae, moss, fungus, scale & efflorescence. It is UV stable, but may not completely halt the fading of all finishes, this is being tested by time now.

While Liquid Quartz is NOT for use over glazes, it has become very popular with artists who glaze only part of their work, to seal the unglazed sections & prevent staining from lips & fingers, as well as dishwashers, & to prevent water seepage under the glazed areas. It has also proven useful for sealing properly cured underglazes (fired to the manufacturer’s instructions). Liquid Quartz will not effect the glazed sections of your work, (it will simply bead & run off a non porous surface during application) nor will it change the look of your clay body or underglazes. We have also had reports of great results sealing leaky glazed wares from woodfirings, in between the cracks of crazed & crawled glazes from both electric & gas firings, & on the unglazed areas of raku fired work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.