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Applying Oxides


Malcolm
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I often apply oxides under glazes to emphasise textures,  but have found that dipping an oxide pot into the glaze contaminates the bucket of glaze ( I only have small amounts of glaze) and so have begun to spray my glazes with a garden spray. I find this works well. Is there a better way around this?

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When I use iron (mostly) oxide for textures, I wipe back the high places with a wet sponge to get maximum contrast.  Once the wash is dry, I've never noticed iron coming off in the glaze.  I usually add some dark clay and magma to the wash and I think that helps give it a more durable surface.  I didn't always do that and didn't notice the problem then.

As for spraying, it's more wasteful of glaze than dipping, but if you like that approach, the best bet is a compressor and air gun.

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2 hours ago, Malcolm said:

Is there a better way around this?


Consider applying the oxide wash onto the pot prior to bisque firing; Sometimes using a little of the clay body as part of the oxide wash applied prior to the bisque firing improves the adhesion of the wash to the surface.   
Has worked for me. 

LT
 

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Thanks for these suggestions, I guess I am putting my oxides on pretty thickly in the recesses and probably don’t need them so heavily applied. Dipping would be better and certainly less messy. I only use the cheap garden spray technique to prevent the glaze from colouring up. I tend to collect the overspray in the big plastic box that I use as a makeshift spraybooth. If I try an additive, what do you suggest Benzine?  Application at the green ware stage is worth a go. Thanks Magnolia Mud.
 

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@Malcolm if you’d like to make sure @Benzine or @Magnolia Mud Researchnotice your comment, type the @ symbol and begin typing their screen name. A drop down menu will appear and you can select it. It’ll appear in your screen highlighted like this, and they’ll get a notification you mentioned them :)

Welcome to the forum!

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A friend of mine who does handbuilt planters and single fires uses a lot of iron wash.  He uses steel wool for the wipe back.  I don't really like iron wash by itself.  When it's thick it gives a shiny metal look that isn't right for my taste.  Lately I've been using this rutile wash that's a nicer mat brown where it's thick in the crevices

Ball clay 25   Neph Sy  25   RIO  30  Rutile  30   GB  30. 

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