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Hi all,

 

Currently I work with mid-fire slip and glaze my work 'traditionally' to achieve quite muted, natural tones.

I'm thinking about making some wares that I want to be BRIGHT and flat in colour - like popping, primary colours.

I'm wondering what the best way to achieve this level of colour would be?

In my experience using stains in glazes never seems to achieve the flatness I'm after.

I would suspect a coloured slip might be the answer but again using stains only seems to result in pastels - what is the average ratio of stain to slip to achieve a full bodied red for example?

Or would I paint the work all over with an underglaze?

Or something else.

All suggestions appreciated! :)

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6 hours ago, ellareweti said:

I would suspect a coloured slip might be the answer but again using stains only seems to result in pastels - what is the average ratio of stain to slip to achieve a full bodied red for example?

Or would I paint the work all over with an underglaze?

what comes to mind?
Underglaze does allow you to dial in the color with appropriate “Fired color” testing of course and can use a very flat uniform color. Of course a suitable clear is also necessary. I am picturing a fiesta ware type look. We have even done decent uniform consistent ombré with underglazes as well. Might be worth some experimenting in my opinion to see if you like this look.

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Commercial underglazes have bright colors, and are very easy to use. I use Speedball brand, and with the exception of 2 colors, they hold up very well at cone 6. A lot of people use Amaco Velvets, although I've found more color shifts from them when going to cone 6. As always, you'll need to test whatever you get.

 

M-Vase-11.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Hi all,

 

Thanks for your replies!

 

@Bill Kielb yes, Fiesta ware is the exact look I'm after -  and yes, totally aware that an appropriate glaze is needed so would be looking for a semi-matte (or matte if you can use that for tableware) clear to go over top and really make the colours POP. Thanks for the recommendations @neilestrick :)

@Min I've definitely considered the cost of colouring my clay body (even though that's really the look I'd love - bright coloured body with clear glaze over top). By flat I really mean solid pigmentation (so I guess I can paint the underglaze all over) but I'd also like to achieve as matte a finish as tableware (foodsafe) will allow also.

Can any underglazer remain exposed/unglazed or will it wear and be unsafe for food?

 

Thanks!

 

Edited by ellareweti
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18 hours ago, ellareweti said:

Can any underglazer remain exposed/unglazed or will it wear and be unsafe for food?

Without testing each one for leaching it would be impossible to say. Commercial underglazes I've seen all have a disclaimer that they need to be covered with an appropriate glaze to be "food safe". Underglazes are more heavily concentrated in colourants than glazes. I'ld be looking at underglazes or slips, depending on your work. Underglazes can go on damp clay, dry greenware or bisque, with slips you need to catch the pot at the right stage of dryness or the slip won't bond with the pot and you can get cracking and shelling of the slip.

Re matte or semi matte glazes for food surfaces, matte glazes tend to cutlery mark more than glossy glazes. Also the underglaze or slip colours won't be as vibrant under a matte or semi matte (satin) glaze. Perhaps you could use a gloss on the interior of mugs or bowls etc and a matte / satin glaze on the outside.

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