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I am trying to condense space and have 2 med size electric kilns and a small test kiln in between them. My problem is that the small kiln in order to be far enough away from the other 2 sticks out into the room. I want to put it up on wheels so I can push it between the two and then just one side or another when one of the others are firing. The little kiln has the standard metal stand and what I was thinking of doing is just grabbing one of those piano mover carts and put a piece of plywood to make it solid and then metal sheet over the top of that and then the kiln stand and kiln. Will this work or will the heat just flow through to the wood and be a risk? Should I get a piece of cement backer board as well? Has anyone  put one of these little 3/4 cf kilns up on wheels? 

the kiln and proposed base: 

 

Milwaukee Hand Trucks & Dollies #73700

smallkiln.jpg

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I'd never recommend that for a larger kiln, but for a baby test kiln it'll probably work. I'd pull off the carpet, build up the middle section with a couple more cross pieces so it's level all the way across, then a layer of plywood to stiffen it up, then two layers of cement board, then the kiln stand.

Personally, since you've got to mess with cutting plywood anyway, I'd skip the pre-built dolly. Just take two layers of 3/4" plywood and glue/screw them together, add two layers of cement board, and buy cheap casters from Harbor Freight. That way you can make it the proper dimensions, just slightly larger than the stand. That's how I built my glaze bucket dollies, and they handle 10 gallon buckets. Get wheels that won't dent while it sits stationary- hard rubber, metal, plastic.

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Posted (edited)

perfect! Yeah been buying lots of casters lately. Putting benches and almost all equipment on wheels. Yeah the dolly was trying to toss something together in 5 minutes with that and scrapes, never a smart move. Your suggestion is dead on, thanks. Hey I dont know if they sell them every where but I found the greatest heavy duty plastic 360 degree rolling planter stands years ago at lowes for I think around $10 that fit 5 Gallon buckets perfectly. Bought about 30 of them and use them for glaze buckets and scrap and water buckets. really saves the back.

Edited by Stephen
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stephen,  while you have the plywood and saw out, why not make a place above ground to store those posts that are on the floor?  maybe they were only there temporarily but having a set of shelves to put them on the wall will save your back over time.

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10 hours ago, oldlady said:

stephen,  while you have the plywood and saw out, why not make a place above ground to store those posts that are on the floor?  maybe they were only there temporarily but having a set of shelves to put them on the wall will save your back over time.

ha ha, yep need to figure that out I posted here a few months ago the day I was going to put wooden shelves up on the wall and you guys convinced me it needed to be a metal rack because it would be within 2 feet of the top and been meaning to pick one up. If I get this little one up on wheels then it is a lot easier to get back in that area and will prob put it against that wall in the pic. At this point we have 100's of those and prob the 50ish we mostly use that sit under/around the kilns they come out of. Thanks for the prompt, I will buy one when I go get the backer board.

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I purchased this table and placed my Olympic SQ169 kiln with its stand on top. I cut the leg so there is room to store the shelves and low enough so I don't have to strecth or bend over to reach the bottom of the kiln. The kiln has a down draft vent and when the kiln reached 2195° I tested to see how how it was by placing my hand under the shelve. It was warm and not at all uncomfortable. The shelf's height is adjustable with set screws.

I have experience with this product and know it can handle 250+lbs without a problem. That said I only move it a distance of about 5 feet while it is empty to either where I store or fire it. I ordered the 24"x36" for $152 and free shipping

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B016DN1B32/ref=dp_c

 

61sXTA9P1wL._SL1200_.jpg

 

Edited by Smokey2
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1 hour ago, Smokey2 said:

I purchased this table and placed my Olympic SQ169 kiln with its stand on top. I cut the leg so there is room to store the shelves and low enough so I don't have to strecth or bend over to reach the bottom of the kiln. The kiln has a down draft vent and when the kiln reached 2195° I tested to see how how it was by placing my hand under the shelve. It was warm and not at all uncomfortable. The shelf's height is adjustable with set screws.

I have experience with this product and know it can handle 250+lbs without a problem. That said I only move it a distance of about 5 feet while it is empty to either where I store or fire it. I ordered the 24"x36" for $152 and free shipping

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B016DN1B32/ref=dp_c

 

61sXTA9P1wL._SL1200_.jpg

 

Fantastic solution! It is more pricey than I want to spend right now but slick. I am going over to Harbor freight and check out carts. Thanks!

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This is $60 at harbor freight and I am thinking of just removing the stand and sitting the kiln on  about 6 2" kiln post for a little airflow, on the shelf. The kiln with controller is 23 x27 and the cart shelf is 24x36. Wonder if the bottom bricks get hot enough to melt the shelf if theres a gap? The desc say heavy duty sheet steal and steel is supposed to melt around 2500f-2700f. Smokies stainless steel is supposed to be good to closer to 3000f. 

Hate cutting cement board as it wipes out my blade whenever I do it but will if I get a negative reaction here.

Neil does that sound ok or should I go back to backer boardimage.png.ddeab87de012013e45ac9a8188776a24.png?

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See photo for how my test kiln is mounted on a small furniture dolly; used a large 4" cement block as a flat surface between the kiln legs and the dolly; been in use since 2006.  The cement block down low balances the  high center of mass of the kiln and reduces the tendency of the kiln to fall over when moved.  

zfig-1-b.jpg.b9f4cc5f3d0dcc752afb83e96302e6a2.jpg


 

Edited by Magnolia Mud Research
Misspelled
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3 hours ago, Stephen said:

This is $60 at harbor freight and I am thinking of just removing the stand and sitting the kiln

I have cart like that as well and thought it was way to flimsy to handle the weight. I know its rated for better than 400lb load but I just didn't trust it. Remember that 400lbs is divided between 2 shelves and there is no support under the top shelf. The one I posted has two channels under the top shelf to handle and distribute the load. Plus you want locking wheels and ones that run smooth too.

I wouldn't do it.

If you need to keep costs down @Magnolia Mud Research has a good option too.

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6 hours ago, dhPotter said:

@Stephen When I cut metal roofing or plastic I turn the blade around so that the teeth are running backwards. Saves the blade. You might try this for the cement board.

Saw works good on those things-I think it would also work on cement board it the teeth are wide enough.Uses the back side of teeth to cut-fron side is still sharp. dhPotter is spot on with that 

Edited by Mark C.
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