Jump to content

Recommended Posts

After reading all of this my questions are:  Do you need to reclaim your clay at all?  Could you afford to throw it away until  Covid 19 has a vaccine?

Does it build up so much that it must be dealt with every week?   When I was taking classes at the U of MN, there must have been 16 to 20  class times a week with 20 students per class.   We reclaimed the clay maybe every other week.   Unless your students produce large amounts to be reclaimed, would there be a place to put the reclaim so it could sit in brutes - large buckets - for a month (or two)? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I teach 180  high school students Ceramics & Sculpture.     We will likely start the year in a hybrid A&B format where we have half a class load on any one day, about 18 students.  Based on local COVID levels we may switch between a normal 5 day schedule or a 100% online format.  

 

Here is my plan:

Each student will have their own 6 foot wide work station and their own shelf in a cabinet somewhat near where they sit.     Each station will have sanitation items,  such as paper towels and disinfectant spray for students to use clean at the end of the class period.   This system will replace the current large wet sponge and squeegee system.    I'd rather not clean each table myself, between classes to limit my own exposure .

Typically we only have a set of 40-50 community tools that are used by everyone throughout the day,  all the typical stuff, needed tool, sponges, paint brushes,  ribs etc.    I'd like to have a set for each student to keep a set in their cabinet.   Cost is a HUGE worry as this solution will triple the cost in consumables (depending on the year the program is allocated between $12 to $16 per student for all program costs for the whole school year.)   California school  budgets are getting tighter as the needs are increasing!

In a normal year we recycle clay a couple time a day, year round.    The suggestion in this thread regarding allowing the clay to sit for an extended period of time prior to recycling looks to be a solid plan, easy to implement that doesn't add to the costs.    I plan to provide each student a bag of clay and a small bucket for recycle to handle their weekly needs.   Periodically the bags can be replaced with recycled clay. 

Access to the sink, slab roller, extruder glaze buckets etc. is difficult to limit  the flow in-and-out of that area, which is too small of an area.    The smaller class size will help & encouraging students to be wise when they choose to  use those areas.    Disinfecting  that area a few time a day seems to be the only viable approach. 

My normal habit is to circulate throughout the classroom helping individual students , often by making  quick examples with the clay and tools the student have at their tables or by having conversations from  the other side of the narrow tables,  perhaps a 3 foot distance.    This is how I make an effort to connect with my students, I try to talk to each student indivgually, everyday.    This will have change.   More talking across the room  from behind a teachers desk,  perhaps with plexiglass shields.     More like talking to a bank teller.  

No throwing on the wheel.   No group projects.

More of an emphasis on drawing, design concepts & history/cultural lessons for the day the students are learning online.  

Flipped classroom concepts may be of value.   Have the students design, plan and otherwise think through their projects while participating in online learning so that the classroom time is reserved for the hands-on portion of the class. 

 

Or another option:

Teach a different type of art class for a year that lend itself to limited physical contact,  such as a digital art class or 3D CGI course.     This option would require the proper hardware and software at a cost as well.   This years crop of student will also not be exposed to the inherent benefits of a hands-on 3D class.      However this solution  will nearly completely circumvent  the health issues inherent in a hands-on class. 

 

 

Your thoughtful thoughts are welcome and appreciated. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2020 at 5:09 PM, Babs said:

Own tools prob not essential.

Low diluted bleach basin to put "cleaned" tools at end of class.

 

Due to safety concerns, bleach has been banned in my district.   That could change due to COVID.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The districts probably have an industrial cleanser for cleaning that would be disinfecting. That in a bucket with a strainer of some sort so you could lift out the tools into a rinse bucket would probably work.

All3n, in my early days during student teaching my coop used buckets for every table for clean up and personal clean up. Rooms did not have sinks, Her husband mad a large cart, that she pushed down the halls with a large water set up. You could use buckets in your room to do the same for most of your clean up problems two for each table, clean and rinse. 

As far as the CGD courses, might be a good time to get a foot in the door. In the 80's I wrote a grant with a Music teacher to get a computer lab for the arts. Started off small, and ended up when I retired with 25 high end machines for computer animation both 2D and 3D.

 

best,

Pres

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been doing a lot of handbuilding of late, butter stick dishes and covers. Today, after posting earlier, I got to thinking about habits.

When handbuilding, I keep a bag of clay, going. In other words, this bag has started as a new bag, and as I roll out a slab for a project, and trim the pieces, they go back in the bag, with a light mist of water. This bag can go on for a week, as I rewedge balls of clay, slam angle then roll, trim and continue. 

When throwing, I am doing much the same, one bag is used for throwing scraps, and trimmings, water added as needed, covered at night. The bag sits in a bucket, and when full gets twisted and turned upside down. A fresh bag added to the bucket. This allows me to come back a few days later and bread cut/slam a few times and possibly adding water, before wedging.

I would think that with the concern of the community slop bucket with coronavirus that this technique would work if each student were to do the same process and store their clay with their other items in a locker or storage bin. I did not have lockers for every student so had them bring in their own boxes/storage containers to store pots in progress/aprons and other things.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/19/2020 at 9:44 AM, Pres said:

I believe in the long run it would be important to do a few things differently with clean ups in art classrooms in general. 

  • When cleaning tables at the end of the period, do so with disinfectants, not just soapy water.
  • use a microwave or other method to disinfect sponges and other cleaning materials each period.
  • Have hand sanitizer dispenser on hand at the door to be used on entry and exit.
  • keep a rotation of recycled clay 3 days old.
  • Be vigilant of students with apparent health problems,
  • where ever possible keep students at 6 foot distancing, until the pandemic has passed.

Others, here should add to this list, as it would help those on the front lines.

 

best,

Pres

All good suggestions, but I don't see how 6 foot distancing could actually work.  My tables are 4X4', so even if I had two per table (I usually have four) it obviously doesn't work.  If I had one student per table, that would work, but it would also cut my classes sizes down about 75%.

I do like the table sanitizing idea though.  It would be another way I can really emphasize the need to clean the tables, because normally me saying, "Be respectful of those that come after you, and don't leave a film of dust on the tables." isn't enough...

On 6/24/2020 at 1:01 AM, All3n said:

Due to safety concerns, bleach has been banned in my district.   That could change due to COVID.  

What do you use instead?  The "Bloodborne Pathogen" training we take every year, instructs us to use bleach when cleaning up bodily fluids (And you better know the correct ratio of bleach and water you are supposed to use, because that's one of the test questions!)

On 6/24/2020 at 9:29 AM, Sorcery said:

Does no one believe our addiction to hand sanitizer is what caused this in the first place?

Sorce

Some doctors and scientists would agree, though I think it is more in regards to bacteria.  We use stronger disinfectants, and overuse antibiotics, and the bacteria evolve to counter them.  Viruses can't technically evolve, since they aren't technically a living thing.  They can mutate, but that isn't so much in response to changes, as it is that they just aren't very good about replicating themselves. 

I've also heard doctors and scientists say, that they feel that our obsession with cleanliness and trying to protect our kids from any type of allergen is why autoimmune diseases seem to be on the rise.  We don't allow our immune system to do its job, and then when a relatively harmless substance is introduced to our bodies, it goes haywire and just attacks everything.  Our bodies are both very impressive and very stupid, at the same time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/27/2020 at 1:30 AM, Benzine said:

I will also note, that as of today, my State's plan is for Schools  to return as normal, with no masks or social distancing required...

Nothing stopping you wearing a mask yourself and developing a best practice policy for safety of all in your classroom.

Foodhandling courses do this.

Stay safe Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2020 at 10:41 AM, Benzine said:

All good suggestions, but I don't see how 6 foot distancing could actually work.  My tables are 4X4', so even if I had two per table (I usually have four) it obviously doesn't work.  If I had one student per table, that would work, but it would also cut my classes sizes down about 75%.

Could you put plexiglas dividers in the middle of your tables so you could have two students at each table?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If someone thinks you are being excessive with plexiglass dividers, just say it's to counter mud spats from wedging and other handbuilding activities. ^_^

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2020 at 12:06 AM, Babs said:

Nothing stopping you wearing a mask yourself and developing a best practice policy for safety of all in your classroom.

Foodhandling courses do this.

Stay safe Ben

Definitely nothing stopping me, but the mask would only be for the student's benefit.  If they aren't wearing them, it doesn't do any good.  Especially considering that I have been tested recently.  So I am fairly confident, that I won't give anything to them.

Without masks being required, I can see quite a few of my colleagues refusing to come in.  I can also see *a lot* of parents, who keep their kids home too!

On 6/29/2020 at 2:13 PM, neilestrick said:

Could you put plexiglas dividers in the middle of your tables so you could have two students at each table?

There's definitely nothing saying that I can't do that.  It would just be a matter of getting the District to purchase the plexi and make them stand upright.  I mean yeah, I could do that myself, but I've got a lot on my plate as is.

On 6/29/2020 at 4:49 PM, Pres said:

If someone thinks you are being excessive with plexiglass dividers, just say it's to counter mud spats from wedging and other handbuilding activities. ^_^

 

best,

Pres

Ha!  I don't think anyone will criticize me for anything like that.  Honestly, it's just all still weird to think about. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may be bug free at the mo but as soon as you walk out the door,  who knows.

Who knows what your students will bring in the door.

You get sick and your possibly  needy students are without your positive presence in their lives.

Lead by example, wear a mask, it has been proven to help stop the spread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/1/2020 at 5:33 PM, Babs said:

You may be bug free at the mo but as soon as you walk out the door,  who knows.

Who knows what your students will bring in the door.

You get sick and your possibly  needy students are without your positive presence in their lives.

Lead by example, wear a mask, it has been proven to help stop the spread.

No worries Babs. 

I have nothing against masks, just stating what my State's current plans are.  I honestly think things will change in the next month or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/4/2020 at 6:26 PM, Babs said:

No worries indeed!

Good aussie phrase!

Keep potting!

Indeed it is a good Aussie phrase!  I've been borrowing it for a while.  I hope your Countrymen and Women don't mind.

Slightly related.  My three year old is big into an animated show called "Bluey".  It is a family of anthropomorphic  Australian dogs and their adventures.  Because of this, he has started saying "Mum" instead of "Mom".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Babs said:

Bluey!!!

My grandchildren speak of Bluey as if part of the family and disgusted with Granny Babs who doesn't know the names or relationships involved.

"She'll be right mate"..

We all hope.

Yeah, my son loves it!

I wasn't sure if it was a show that was actually broadcast in Australia, or if it was just made to look like it was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Benzine said:

Yeah, my son loves it!

I wasn't sure if it was a show that was actually broadcast in Australia, or if it was just made to look like it was.

Unfortunately yes!

Very realistic!

Ausiefarm dogs really intelligent. No anthropomophic content at all

Not mine!

Screenshot_20180930-092251_Facebook.jpg

Edited by Babs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.