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21 minutes ago, Barbsbus 4 fun said:

Can I make a pizza stone with the cone 6 clay?  

I don’t think it’s the best, google Robbie LaBell she has some decent recipes for low expansion clays that probably would work better. Case in point when we remove pots from the kiln (cone 6) we have found that placing them on a nice metal cart when they are three hundred degrees often cracks them because the metal suddenly cools them. Place them on a wood cart, no issue. Pizza stones are often in the 425 rangę and folks tend to remove them and place them right on top of some nice cold steel burner grates atop their stove. I think the low expansion high thermal shock clay would be best actually, 

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A piece of kiln shelve works better.

As long as the clay can take oven temps-Like stonewares with grog and special ingredients -oven proof clay is different clay than most sold at stores

Edited by Mark C.
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I’ve never seen anyone remove the pizza stone from an oven when it’s blazing hot. The pizza can removed with a wooden pizza peel, or just use a pair of tongs to slide the pizza onto a cutting board. Leave the stone in the oven to cool. So a cone 6 clay pizza stone would work fine.

Having said that, I personally use a 15 inch cordierite kiln shelf. Though I can see the appeal of wanting to hand make your own out of clay.

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4 hours ago, GEP said:

I’ve never seen anyone remove the pizza stone from an oven when it’s blazing hot. The pizza can removed with a wooden pizza peel, or just use a pair of tongs to slide the pizza onto a cutting board. Leave the stone in the oven to cool. So a cone 6 clay pizza stone would work fine.

Having said that, I personally use a 15 inch cordierite kiln shelf. Though I can see the appeal of wanting to hand make your own out of clay.

I always remove my pizza and stone when done to the top of my stove. Have a pair of oven mitts just for the occasion. Regular clay might work, I still think I would just use the low expansion stuff though. Seen enough pots crack right out of the kiln when set on a conductive surface.

Edited by Bill Kielb
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8 minutes ago, Bill Kielb said:

I actually do, use Lees, no flaking. Can do both sides and rotate as desired.;)

What is the recipe for Lees kiln wash? The pre-mixed stuff I'm using now does flake...in the kiln, not the oven...

Edited by JohnnyK
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1 hour ago, liambesaw said:

You could use a spodumene clay body.  Seattle pottery supply makes one.  They're supposedly not the easiest to work with but I think you could probably manage a platter shape

I have thrown some and they seem fine. Hard to get a decent glaze match but for a pizza stone almost no need.

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1 hour ago, JohnnyK said:

What is the recipe for Lees kiln wash? The pre-mixed stuff I'm using now does flake...in the kiln, not the oven...

Never did find the recipe for Lees and our premixed goes nowhere once applied.

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I use a 1” thick kiln shelf in my propane bbq for my pizza stone. I roll out my dough on parchment paper, build the pizza, and preheat the kiln shelf so it is good and hot. I cook the pizza with the paper still stuck to the dough. It never burns and for some reason makes the bottom of the pizza resistant to burning. (During the cooking, the dough firms up and does not stick to the paper).  I needed to raise the pizza stone up off of the grill by an inch or so to have it a bit away from the burner to avoid the crust burning. For this I used broken bits of kiln shelves. I also grill fish this way, also on top of the paper. Sure is nice to make a fresh pizza outside when it is blazing hot outside. Keeps the house cool! And the kiln shelf really does a nice job of providing even heat across the surface for even cooking. 
My bbq is a low budget model but it does get up to 800F which is great for pizza! 

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1 hour ago, Mosey Potter said:

I use a 1” thick kiln shelf in my propane bbq for my pizza stone. I roll out my dough on parchment paper, build the pizza, and preheat the kiln shelf so it is good and hot. I cook the pizza with the paper still stuck to the dough. It never burns and for some reason makes the bottom of the pizza resistant to burning. (During the cooking, the dough firms up and does not stick to the paper).  I needed to raise the pizza stone up off of the grill by an inch or so to have it a bit away from the burner to avoid the crust burning. For this I used broken bits of kiln shelves. I also grill fish this way, also on top of the paper. Sure is nice to make a fresh pizza outside when it is blazing hot outside. Keeps the house cool! And the kiln shelf really does a nice job of providing even heat across the surface for even cooking. 
My bbq is a low budget model but it does get up to 800F which is great for pizza! 

I have a pizza stone, one for the house and one in my grill compartment. Very useful.

8BEBFBA3-385A-4CAE-8B38-0948BF33A626.jpeg

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I use a Corelite kiln shelf in my grill, as the air gaps in the shelf keep the burners from getting the shelf too hot. I can crank the grill all the way up and get it to 600F inside, without the shelf getting so hot that it just burns the bottom of the crust since the burners blast it. The Corelite also seems to deal with the heat better, as I cracked 3 pizza stones in a month before using it. I make a fairly wet crust that shocks the shelf a bit with first contact.

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5 hours ago, neilestrick said:

I use a Corelite kiln shelf in my grill, as the air gaps in the shelf keep the burners from getting the shelf too hot. I can crank the grill all the way up and get it to 600F inside, without the shelf getting so hot that it just burns the bottom of the crust since the burners blast it. The Corelite also seems to deal with the heat better, as I cracked 3 pizza stones in a month before using it. I make a fairly wet crust that shocks the shelf a bit with first contact.

Looks spot on so if you are placing cold or wet items on a pizza stone, or any item  on a stone most food service / pizza stone fanatics and manufactures suggest a cordierite because of shock resistance.  Of course no self respecting pasta lover would ever entertain not preheating your stone! :wacko: Cordierite versions are usually slightly more costly than the ceramic.

They make pizza screens as well so for those that want to brown up the bottom crust (midfire, if you will)  ...... there is that. My mothers family - 1st gen. Italian, (13 children) lots of Italian food and ways to prepare in my diet growing up.

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