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Hi all,

I want to try majolica and have read that frit should be added to oxides and stains but is that always necessary? What would be the outcome if I just mixed it with water and maybe CMC (which I already have)

I'm just trying to avoid buying things that are unnecessary.

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Momo
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It's not necessary, it just helps oxides "stick" to bare clay.  A glaze is already fluxed, so using oxides with water is fine.  Look at fine asian brushwork pieces, you can watch them mix their pigments. Manganese and cobalt for black, cobalt oxide for blue, it's imptessive.  One small mistake and it's ruined forever.

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I would use the frit. Some stains are fairly refractory, and the frit will help them melt into the majolica glaze, especially since majolica glazes are quite stiff. It will also dilute the stain, so you don't end up with it being too intense. Another thing you can do is use the majolica glaze as a base for your overglaze colors. You'd have to test the proportions that work best, but I'd start with 50/50 and go from there. It all depends on how intense you want the colors to be. Using CMC gum in the mix will make it brush on better, and keep everything suspended in the water, especially if you're just using stain and frit.

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Thanks, guys.  Much appeciated. Will any frit do? I've heard that 3124 is recommended but they're out of stock at the moment so will 3134 do instead? I'm  wanting a pale, watercolour look so will also try mixing the majolica glaze with the stains. Thanks.

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3134 is almost the same as 3124, except that your proposed substitute has alumina, and the original doesn’t. I don’t know that it’ll make a huge difference with majolica or underglaze application, but if the piece you’re talking about is dear, it’s always a safer bet to run a test first. 

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If you use the glaze as Neil suggested you'll get a paler palette due to the tin oxide or whatever chemical is giving you the "white".

Make a tile or two and glaze, just run a brushstroke of each .Note dilution etc .Keep to show coloyrs obtained foor future use.

If not using CMC constant stirring your friend

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Yes! Try mixing the glaze with and without the tin oxide or zircopax or whatever is being used to opacify the glaze and see how it affects your colors. You should be able to dial in the intensity of the colors pretty quickly with a simple line blend. You should be able to get the color you want with just one brush stroke, no multiple layers.

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