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jrgpots

how hot do 9 inch walls get?

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1.  During a firing, how hot will the outside of the 9 inch walls of the kiln get if the kiln is fired to ^6  or ^10?

2.  How close can the kiln be to a wall?

 

Jed

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1 hour ago, jrgpots said:

1.  During a firing, how hot will the outside of the 9 inch walls of the kiln get if the kiln is fired to ^6  or ^10?

2.  How close can the kiln be to a wall?

 

Jed

Typical gas kiln can get too hot to touch but many of them are double wall, air gap, some filler. Regardless, typical specification is 12-18” of combustible wall. Other interior codes depending on use would be to not have combustible construction in place. You probably could download instructions from a similar kiln and get an idea of what is acceptable. A nine inch kiln wall is likely a gas kiln so Sorry if I assumed incorrectly.. A good answer to this will require more specifics on kiln,  location (interior / exterior) , type of construction presently, occupancy use group, current fire protection .......... Lots of variables here to research before placement and use.

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I would shoot for at least 18" any way you do it.

You may be able to find information about heat coming off the kiln from the commercial kiln makers- Bailey, Geil, etc.- but many commercial kilns use 4.5" of brick and some other insulation behind it, rather than just 9" of brick, because they can make the kiln lighter and smaller that way, which makes it easier to ship. They also typically have a full metal outer jacket. So it may not be exactly what you want, but it would be a good approximation.

You can also find info from the brick manufacturers on hot face vs cold face temps.

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What is the 9 inch wall made of-more specifics please -I have a few 9 inch wall gas kilns

expalin the makeup of the 9 inch

all hardbrick?

1/2 soft brick?

all soft brick?

some fiber?

Once I know that I can go further

also are burners on the side of kiln where wall is?./ this maters a lot as well as they run hotter than just a kiln wall

details are whats needed for me 

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My exterior skin temperature at cone 10 is about 350F with six inches of fiber.  So construction  material is critical.

Very nice on my back to sit next to at the end of the firing.

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15 hours ago, Mark C. said:

What is the 9 inch wall made of-more specifics please -I have a few 9 inch wall gas kilns

expalin the makeup of the 9 inch

all hardbrick?

1/2 soft brick?

all soft brick?

some fiber?

Once I know that I can go further

also are burners on the side of kiln where wall is?./ this maters a lot as well as they run hotter than just a kiln wall

details are whats needed for me 

all soft brick except around ports and chimney outflow.  There is also 3"  layer of fiber on top of this  20 cu ft gas fired downdraft.

 

Jed

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Just now, jrgpots said:

all soft brick except around ports and chimney outflow.  There is also 3"  layer of fiber on top of this  20 cu ft gas fired downdraft.

 

Jed

Which type of soft brick? K23 and K26 insulate differently. Coarse or fine? Not all IFB are the same.

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K26 IFB  wall, no current fiber boards or sheet metal on the outside.   I don't know about course or fine.  sorry.

Edited by jrgpots

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I have limited space.  So I have to plan my shed construction accordingly.  I thought I would Build the shed Just a bit wider than the kiln's width.  The side walls would be removable panels that I would remove while firing.  They would then be rehung after the firing to protect the kiln from the weather.  The support framing will be steel sucker pipe at the corner and steel framing studs where needed.  

Jed

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So my wood siding on the side of building is 5 feet from  4 burner side  (natural draft burners) of kiln.

My wall is 4.5 soft brick-4.5 hard brick on outside-The wood walls get really hot but not to hot .I can meter it on Saturday for you with my laser temp meter during next glaze fire in two days. The bricks get about 350 as noted in abpove post but thats not the issue its the wall you are building that matters. I would say -3-4 feet for a all soft brick kiln as long as the burners (open ports are not on that side)You did not answer what side the burners are on for me?? As the open ports are the hots areas in any kiln-if your burners are away from that kiln wall you could do 3 feet for wood wall-You can also hang some tile backer board with a spacer  if needed. This is for wood walls. If you go metal studs and sheet metal its a lot closer-I would do the steel and forget about taking it apart every fire-thats making it a pain to start with. Since if I recall you are in a CCR area put up a nice fence to thats up to the CCR home code and then biuld this behind out of view.

You want to be able to walk around all sides of kiln and have a space for shelves and posts and supplies .

You want walls to stop the wind-yes the wind can affect the firing

PS beware  posts  on this forum may be  1/2 baked so take this info  with pinch of baking powder

Edited by Mark C.

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burner ports are on the back side and will be about 3 feet away from the back wall.   There will be doors on the back side to open during firing, giving me more room as well as a windbreak.  I can build with steel siding.  Already have the cinder block walls.  I can also put "temporary walls" (dry stacked)  around the burners to form a  windbreak.

Jed

 

P.S.  as long as those post use witnessed cones to show how "Baked" they are, I'm fine with them

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The 1/2 baked is from another poster on another thread-It almost got under my tough skin

The bricks Neil was was taking about are this

soft bricks come in these k factors-the k is the top end working temp.You can exceed that but they will spall sooner

k23 usually smooth although there are rough ones made in China now-same with k25s (odd k size but usually china made and rough

k26-rougher than smaooth k23

k28s also rough

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Mine are from the Minnesota flat top you told me about 2-3 years ago in Fresno, CA.  The kiln was built built in the late 80'S I think.  They are ruff.  

 

Thanks.

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Your 9 inch soft brick wall will run cooler than my combo soft and hard wall

My wall is k 26 and some k28 and hard brick around burner ports -outside is all hard brick for looks.

I have forgotten about that deal I sent your way. good luck on the kiln building

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Jed I tested all my surfaces during glaze fires yesterday -a 5 feet during hieght of cone 11 fire-wood surfaces where 165 degrees at 5 feet away-kiln shelves at 3 feet where 150

metal rack at 2.5 feet 90 degrees

this was on the side where 4 burners have open ports-really hot on those two sides

The back side of kiln ( no burners) at two feet very cool at 125. thats more like your kiln with 9 inchs of k26 soft brick

I still would make metal shed so you can walk around whole kiln.

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