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Looking for solutions: glaze specking, liner glazing, glazing over stamp


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Hey!

I’m in the final stages oh my cappuccino cup project and i have 3 main blockers. :( need some tips

 

1. Specking - black dots on inner white glaze.  Possible causes? 

2. Liner glazing. Since i plan on dipping, can’t get the liner glazing techniques to work. The outer glaze is leaching in the inner glaze.  Anyone doing liner glazes and have really good results? Mind sharing some tips?
3.  Stamp details get lost with dipping. Glaze gathers in small edges in the stamp. Non uniform application of glaze. Glazing by spraying works better but it’s too much waste and time consuming.

Posted pictures on google drive and the the folder public. The forum has really low limits for images. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1VE-ly-hcgNWCAQdFH9W24pWY8a5V1Vfp

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6 hours ago, Mitzuuu89 said:

Hey!

I’m in the final stages oh my cappuccino cup project and i have 3 main blockers. :( need some tips

 

1. Specking - black dots on inner white glaze.  Possible causes? 

2. Liner glazing. Since i plan on dipping, can’t get the liner glazing techniques to work. The outer glaze is leaching in the inner glaze.  Anyone doing liner glazes and have really good results? Mind sharing some tips?
3.  Stamp details get lost with dipping. Glaze gathers in small edges in the stamp. Non uniform application of glaze. Glazing by spraying works better but it’s too much waste and time consuming.

Posted pictures on google drive and the the folder public. The forum has really low limits for images. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1VE-ly-hcgNWCAQdFH9W24pWY8a5V1Vfp

Dots in white glaze likely iron, I like them adds character. Likely  in glaze or your claybody. Outside glaze could break more so different glaze would show off the stamped work.  Aside from spraying everything, it is a bit of a pain I know, I often have the liner come up and over the rim then final dip the outside glaze up to it. So fill inside, pour off carefully. Lightly rim dip, then when able dip the outside submersing  just enough to meet the liner. Nice mugs!

some ideas, one sprayed up to rim and one over rim style

5658E640-C0E6-452C-BBEA-FF2B7B78AE6F.jpeg

E11F78D2-8507-47E7-A146-68D42AED60EF.jpeg

Edited by Bill Kielb
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Hi Mitzu!

Dots:  can't tell if there are irregularities in the surface at all - a pit or dimple at all? Looks like something in the glaze.

Liner: I'm pleased with Tony Hansen's wax and cut technique; he has an article https://digitalfire.com/article/how+to+liner-glaze+a+mug and a video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlZqlsF1rFU (his video and articles on adjusting thixotropy are gold, imo). It's a bit of trouble and time

  Don't get wax on clay! A quick torching will burn it off. 

  Don't overdo the lip dip, but do get a nice bead on there - wait for it to set up before turning the mug upright, shake it, turn it, shake it...

  Wait for the wax to fully dry! Be careful - don't disrupt your wax job.

  Take care on the outside dip - a burp will splash drops up inside.

  Have a small sponge and/or wet finger ready, and use them appropriately and at the right times.

The edge can come out very clean, given patience and practice.

The other approach I'll take is to pour the liner, then dip the lip so the liner comes down the outside a quarter inch or so, and sponge a bit to feather the edge. Later on, I'll dip the outside glaze, base first, such that the outside colour gets right up to the edge. The overlap typically causes the outside glaze to move a bit at the overlap, and also be more glossy - so, not as clean an edge, but nice for the lip.

Stamp: you might tape that square, glaze it with clear, then wax it, and remove the tape when the wax has set up - then your detail may be visible through the clear. Rubbing a bit of something - underglaze, or a coloured glaze - then wiping most of it away before applying clear might also work for you.

 

 

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I do something similar to Hansen's wax and cut that Hulk linked. I pour the liner then wax, then after wax has set up I wipe the excess glaze with a damp sponge. I leave the pots until the next day then glaze the outsides. Type of wax resist makes a difference,  ones that are oil based don't lift the base glaze like the water based ones like Forbes do. If you find the base glaze is lifting from the wax then either glaze as soon as possible before it starts to lift or better yet switch wax resist types. Since it looks like you are using glazes with 2 different bases then it's going to be more difficult to prevent the bleeding of one into the other. If the bases were the same then this doesn't happen. I'ld do the seam at the very highest point on the pot.

I think your stamped area looks great the way it is. If you want the glaze to go on thinner there then try dampening the area with water and a paintbrush then leave the pot sit for about 10 minutes so the water evens out in the clay then glaze. The dampened area will take up less glaze.

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On 5/6/2020 at 6:03 AM, Bill Kielb said:

Dots in white glaze likely iron, I like them adds character. Likely  in glaze or your claybody. Outside glaze could break more so different glaze would show off the stamped work.  Aside from spraying everything, it is a bit of a pain I know, I often have the liner come up and over the rim then final dip the outside glaze up to it. So fill inside, pour off carefully. Lightly rim dip, then when able dip the outside submersing  just enough to meet the liner. Nice mugs!

some ideas, one sprayed up to rim and one over rim style

5658E640-C0E6-452C-BBEA-FF2B7B78AE6F.jpeg

E11F78D2-8507-47E7-A146-68D42AED60EF.jpeg

In regards to specking, most likely i’ve contaminated my glaze. I suspect some rust from the mixer. Got to be more careful with this, costly mistake :D

Practicing the liner technique, i might make a glaze fountain, that might be quicker and easier.

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On 5/6/2020 at 6:13 AM, Hulk said:

Hi Mitzu!

Dots:  can't tell if there are irregularities in the surface at all - a pit or dimple at all? Looks like something in the glaze.

Liner: I'm pleased with Tony Hansen's wax and cut technique; he has an article https://digitalfire.com/article/how+to+liner-glaze+a+mug and a video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlZqlsF1rFU (his video and articles on adjusting thixotropy are gold, imo). It's a bit of trouble and time

  Don't get wax on clay! A quick torching will burn it off. 

  Don't overdo the lip dip, but do get a nice bead on there - wait for it to set up before turning the mug upright, shake it, turn it, shake it...

  Wait for the wax to fully dry! Be careful - don't disrupt your wax job.

  Take care on the outside dip - a burp will splash drops up inside.

  Have a small sponge and/or wet finger ready, and use them appropriately and at the right times.

The edge can come out very clean, given patience and practice.

The other approach I'll take is to pour the liner, then dip the lip so the liner comes down the outside a quarter inch or so, and sponge a bit to feather the edge. Later on, I'll dip the outside glaze, base first, such that the outside colour gets right up to the edge. The overlap typically causes the outside glaze to move a bit at the overlap, and also be more glossy - so, not as clean an edge, but nice for the lip.

Stamp: you might tape that square, glaze it with clear, then wax it, and remove the tape when the wax has set up - then your detail may be visible through the clear. Rubbing a bit of something - underglaze, or a coloured glaze - then wiping most of it away before applying clear might also work for you.

 

 

Hey Hulk!

Thanks for the tips! I’ve been following Tony Hansen’s liner technique as well, it just takes alot of practice to get right. Great info!


I’ve added some ceramic glue to improve the thixotropy, and carefully adjusted the specific gravity. I think it flows much better now.

Also, my stamp used to stick to the clay, i’ve seen a post where people suggested any kind of oil, or WD40 to stop the stickiness. It worked like a charm, the detail on the stamp is amazing!

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Posted (edited)
On 5/6/2020 at 6:56 PM, Min said:

 

I do something similar to Hansen's wax and cut that Hulk linked. I pour the liner then wax, then after wax has set up I wipe the excess glaze with a damp sponge. I leave the pots until the next day then glaze the outsides. Type of wax resist makes a difference,  ones that are oil based don't lift the base glaze like the water based ones like Forbes do. If you find the base glaze is lifting from the wax then either glaze as soon as possible before it starts to lift or better yet switch wax resist types. Since it looks like you are using glazes with 2 different bases then it's going to be more difficult to prevent the bleeding of one into the other. If the bases were the same then this doesn't happen. I'ld do the seam at the very highest point on the pot.

I think your stamped area looks great the way it is. If you want the glaze to go on thinner there then try dampening the area with water and a paintbrush then leave the pot sit for about 10 minutes so the water evens out in the clay then glaze. The dampened area will take up less glaze.

Hey Min!

I agree the leaching might be hard to stop since the glazes are different.

Tried damping the stamp, that helps as less glaze is applied to that area. What i also found helpful is to blow a little while it’s still wet, to move the glaze from the edges. Here’s one the the latest batch.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1k6DSrvlxqguQUp9SqnZDchiFng-hwZEp/view?usp=drivesdk

Edited by Mitzuuu89
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