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Why are so many people selling crazed functional ware?


Scaz
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I’m on a really long and frustrating journey trying to find a glaze/clay match to avoid crazing. But why, time and time again, on YouTube and Instagram am I finding potters with high follower numbers and ‘JUST SOLD OUT ETSY RESTOCK’ posts who are advertising pots, which have clearly got crazing issues?? 
 

Is there a ‘generally accepted’ level of crazing one should expect? Is it ‘normal’ to hear your pottery ping when getting it out of the kiln then later pouring hot liquid in? 
 

I’ve been driving myself nuts, but it appears to not be as serious as I initially thought... am I wasting my time??

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Ask 10 potters if crazing is okay on functional pots and you'll probably get 15 answers. I'm in the no crazing for functional work camp.

A thread with differing points of view here.

 

27 minutes ago, Scaz said:

Is it ‘normal’ to hear your pottery ping when getting it out of the kiln then later pouring hot liquid in? 

If you don't want crazing then, no, pots shouldn't ping when removing from the kiln or pouring hot liquid in. 

It's very much doable to make non-crazing glazes, however some claybodies are more difficult to get a well fitting glaze with than others. It seems that many potters will spend years practicing their throwing or handbuilding skills and yet just go on a wing and a prayer as far as glazing goes. It takes time to learn glaze chem, lots of testing and even more patience. 

Welcome to the forum.

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So, what exactly is the objection to crazed glazes?  I'm guessing we are talking dinnerware.  If it's strictly decorative, who cares, anything goes, right?  If we are talking dinnerware, then are we assuming bacterial growth in the crazing?  Or maybe weakening of the structure to not support dishwashers?  I doubt any dishware producers guarantee microwave compatibility, right?  Or maybe that's not an issue.  Personally, all I have made all my own personal kitchenware, although I don't market this product whatsoever.  I have some pretty funky stuff, as this is not my usual lineup.  Can't say I have noticed any issues.  Except they don't bounce when dropped. 

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If the clay body under the glaze is well vitrified, then crazing doesn't pose any health issues. I've used lots of crazed glazes in my career. Currently I do not, because I don't like how crazing looks with my current work. But I've used a lot of glazes where the crazing adds a lot to the beauty of the piece.

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I go along with you Neil, but prefer my decorative effects to be on the the outside of the pot no where near the food surface. Don't like cleaning crazed surfaces, so Dishwasher them, but then the new dishwashers and soaps are pretty harsh in their trend toward no rinsing before hand. IMHO.

 

best,

Pres

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Lol @CactusPots I'm making our tableware now, since the "thick thin thick" profile of these "free from Jewel", "Rachel Rae" China made Garbage doesn't bounce either! 

...

I drink from crazed things, and I reckon I'd eat off em. People fearing bacteria is why we are all locked down right now! See "antifragile" systems.

Better Crazing than shivering right?

Sorce

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