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Claybottress

Another newbie kiln question

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We had to change the kiln heating elements to support 220 instead of 208, so it's been a while since I posted and I still haven't fired my new kiln! The good news is, I now have a full load and plan to fire as soon as 1. The paint on my kiln shelves dries for 24 hours. 2. I have run a test firing as recommended by Scutt.

So my newbie question is, I have greenware and I have bisqued-ware that has been glazed with underglaze and an 06-rated clear coat. I think it's ok to mix this work as they both get fired to the same temperature of 06. How would you load the underglaze work? Does it matter if it has its own shelves or can I mix with greenware. I am aware to not let the glazed work touch anything. Thank you all so much! 

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It can be mixed.  Be careful that nothing is touching the glazed pieces.  The glaze will stick to anything it touches when it melts.   The greenware pieces can be touching without any problems.

Also you have to slow fire your greenware.  SO follow the slow heat to cone 06

 

Jed

Edited by jrgpots

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2 hours ago, Claybottress said:

We had to change the kiln heating elements to support 220 instead of 208, so it's been a while since I posted and I still haven't fired my new kiln! The good news is, I now have a full load and plan to fire as soon as 1. The paint on my kiln shelves dries for 24 hours. 2. I have run a test firing as recommended by Scutt.

So my newbie question is, I have greenware and I have bisqued-ware that has been glazed with underglaze and an 06-rated clear coat. I think it's ok to mix this work as they both get fired to the same temperature of 06. How would you load the underglaze work? Does it matter if it has its own shelves or can I mix with greenware. I am aware to not let the glazed work touch anything. Thank you all so much! 

It can be done because the glaze and bisque end up fired to the same cone. The interesting thing is that the greenware is off gassing while the glaze is maturing, Bisque firings are 10-12 hours done slowly to drive off chemically bound water and burnout impurities. Glaze firings are approximately 4-9 hours so this firing is not necessarily ideal for your glazed pieces. Having said that many are fine with the results of this and use it daily. It can affect your glazes though so testing is often the only way to know for sure. And yes, no touching for the glaze pieces. A kiln vent is often helpful to ensure the fumes are quickly removed.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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Thanks! It worked out perfectly this time, but in the future I will do a separate glaze firing. I had to use low-fire glazes, and I am not happy with the clear. It's such a relief to have the experience go well - only one little chip and over 40 pieces.  Much gratitude to everyone who chipped in with insights and advice.

 

 

kiln-load.jpg

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